Alexander Junior High School

Skip to main content

Lesson Plans

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 11, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information; Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior Knowledge –
  •   A student should be able to provide an analysis of how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text
  • · A student should be able to provide an analysis of how a particular sentence, chapter, or section contributes to the development of the ideas
  • · A student knows how to compare and contrast the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • · A student knows how to describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. A student knows how to use text features and search tools (e.g., headings, tables of contents, captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons, key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • · Common organizational structures are found in informational texts (cause/effect, comparison/contrast, problem/solution, sequential, chronological).
  • · Informational texts (i.e. textbooks, domain-specific articles) are divided into different parts.
  • · Titles, introductions, headings, and sections.
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read a passage and answer the questions/prompt daily.
  • Make-up work day
  • Spelling Bee
  • Complete test from Friday

 

  • Closure – none




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What phrase from the passage helps you determine the meaning of simultaneously?

a. which could send

b. two messages

c. telegraphic system

d. ultimately developing 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 12, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text. 

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –
  • · Students know that authors develop point of view through author’s style, tone, word choice, description, omission of information, inclusion of information, etc.
  • · Students know that authors can direct readers’ attention to the exact detail, opinion, idea, emotion, etc., the author wants to stress through his or her style of writing.
  • · Students know the ways in which an author’s point of view influences content and style.
  • · An author’s writing is influenced by his experiences, background, and values.
  • · Students know that authors use different points of view to offer different perceptions and to develop a text based on the author’s purpose for writing. Author’s purpose is the reason the author is writing the text.
  • · A student should know how to determine an author’s purpose when it is not explicitly stated in the text.
  • · A student should be able to analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • · A student should be able to compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic and describe the differences in focus and the information provided.
  • · A student should be able to distinguish his or her own point of view from that of the author of a text.
  • · A student should be able to identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.
  • Students will review 4.5 Weeks Test  to prepare for 9  Weeks Test
  • Classworks 20 minutes

 

  • Closure - exit ticket




Homework

 Complete questions 3-5 for homework

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the meaning of the phrase set it aside as it is used in the sentence?

a. discard it 

b. contain it within fencing

c. prevent it from being enjoyed

d. reserve it for a special purpose 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 13, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –
  • Trace means to outline, delineate, or describe.
  • · A student should know the difference between a claim that is supported with reasons and evidence opposed to a claim this is unsupported.
  • · A student should know how to identify a speaker’s claim(s) and explain how each claim is supported by the argument or arguments the speaker makes (the evidence).
  • · A student should understand that a speaker uses reasons, facts, statistics, details, etc. to support his or her arguments for a claim or claims.
  • A claim is a statement of opinion the writer or speaker is trying to prove.
  • · Argument(s) is how the speaker supports his claim(s); argument is the main point or points a speaker makes to provide supporting reasons and evidence for his claim.
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.  
  • Students will review vocabulary words and greek and latin roots by playing "Flashcards" on Quizlet. 
  • Class will continue to review 4.5 Assessment for 9 Weeks test
  • Classworks 20 min.

 

  • Closure - exit ticket




Homework


none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the word relish mean in the poem?

a. to resent

b. to enjoy in full

c. to remember

d. to be frightened by 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 14, 2017  Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –  
  • · How to plan and deliver presentations.
  • · How to sequence ideas logically. · The importance of separating pertinent information from impertinent information when presenting claims and findings.
  • · Pertinent refers to whether or not the description, facts, and details clearly relate to or are relevant to the claim or findings under discussion.
  • · Accentuating a main idea or theme means to present information that emphasizes a main idea or theme by using details, facts, gestures, and body language.
  • · The importance of using appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
  • · How to report on a topic or present an opinion in an organized manner.
  • · How to sequence ideas logically.
  • · How to use appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes.
  • · How to speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  •  · How to tell a story in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main idea or theme.
  • · How to recount an experience in an organized manner
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt .
  • Students will review standards for 9 Weeks Test using 4.5 Week Assessment
  • Students will take Vocabulary Quiz on Greek/Latin words
  • Classworks 20 min

 

  • Closure – exit ticket




Homework

handwriting worksheet

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the poem's form affect meaning in this stanza?

a. The rhyming second and fourth lines focus attention on the colors in the sky. 

b. "Skies" and "sunrise" rhyme and inform readers that the sun rises in the sky. 

c. The lines that rhyme contrast the darkness of night with the lightness of dawn. 

d. "Day start" and "nature's art" rhyme and show readers that morning is beautiful. 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 15, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • 9 Weeks Test




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 4, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information; Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior Knowledge –
  •   A student should be able to provide an analysis of how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text
  • · A student should be able to provide an analysis of how a particular sentence, chapter, or section contributes to the development of the ideas
  • · A student knows how to compare and contrast the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • · A student knows how to describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. A student knows how to use text features and search tools (e.g., headings, tables of contents, captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons, key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • · Common organizational structures are found in informational texts (cause/effect, comparison/contrast, problem/solution, sequential, chronological).
  • · Informational texts (i.e. textbooks, domain-specific articles) are divided into different parts.
  • · Titles, introductions, headings, and sections.
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read a passage and answer the questions/prompt daily.
  • Make-up work day
  • Spelling Bee
  • Complete test from Friday

 

  • Closure – none




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What phrase from the passage helps you determine the meaning of simultaneously?

a. which could send

b. two messages

c. telegraphic system

d. ultimately developing 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 5, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text. 

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –
  • · Students know that authors develop point of view through author’s style, tone, word choice, description, omission of information, inclusion of information, etc.
  • · Students know that authors can direct readers’ attention to the exact detail, opinion, idea, emotion, etc., the author wants to stress through his or her style of writing.
  • · Students know the ways in which an author’s point of view influences content and style.
  • · An author’s writing is influenced by his experiences, background, and values.
  • · Students know that authors use different points of view to offer different perceptions and to develop a text based on the author’s purpose for writing. Author’s purpose is the reason the author is writing the text.
  • · A student should know how to determine an author’s purpose when it is not explicitly stated in the text.
  • · A student should be able to analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • · A student should be able to compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic and describe the differences in focus and the information provided.
  • · A student should be able to distinguish his or her own point of view from that of the author of a text.
  • · A student should be able to identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.
  • Students will receive new greek and latin words and vocabulary words. (Test: December 14)
  • Class will close read “Christmas Truce of 1914” and answer first two questions. 
  • Classworks 20 minutes

 

  • Closure - exit ticket




Homework

 Complete questions 3-5 for homework

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the meaning of the phrase set it aside as it is used in the sentence?

a. discard it 

b. contain it within fencing

c. prevent it from being enjoyed

d. reserve it for a special purpose 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 6, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –
  • Trace means to outline, delineate, or describe.
  • · A student should know the difference between a claim that is supported with reasons and evidence opposed to a claim this is unsupported.
  • · A student should know how to identify a speaker’s claim(s) and explain how each claim is supported by the argument or arguments the speaker makes (the evidence).
  • · A student should understand that a speaker uses reasons, facts, statistics, details, etc. to support his or her arguments for a claim or claims.
  • A claim is a statement of opinion the writer or speaker is trying to prove.
  • · Argument(s) is how the speaker supports his claim(s); argument is the main point or points a speaker makes to provide supporting reasons and evidence for his claim.
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.  
  • Students will review vocabulary words and greek and latin roots by playing "Flashcards" on Quizlet. 
  • Class will review answers to questions 3-5 completed for homework.
  • Classworks 20 min.

 

  • Closure - exit ticket




Homework


none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the word relish mean in the poem?

a. to resent

b. to enjoy in full

c. to remember

d. to be frightened by 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 7, 2017  Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –  
  • · How to plan and deliver presentations.
  • · How to sequence ideas logically. · The importance of separating pertinent information from impertinent information when presenting claims and findings.
  • · Pertinent refers to whether or not the description, facts, and details clearly relate to or are relevant to the claim or findings under discussion.
  • · Accentuating a main idea or theme means to present information that emphasizes a main idea or theme by using details, facts, gestures, and body language.
  • · The importance of using appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.
  • · How to report on a topic or present an opinion in an organized manner.
  • · How to sequence ideas logically.
  • · How to use appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes.
  • · How to speak clearly at an understandable pace.
  •  · How to tell a story in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main idea or theme.
  • · How to recount an experience in an organized manner
  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt .
  • Students will answer questions 6-8 in groups for “Christmas Truce of 1914”.
  • Students will review vocabulary and greek/latin roots by playing “Gravity” on Quizlet. 
  • Citing Textual Evidence Lesson 4 – student application
  • Classworks 20 min

 

  • Closure – exit ticket




Homework

handwriting worksheet

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the poem's form affect meaning in this stanza?

a. The rhyming second and fourth lines focus attention on the colors in the sky. 

b. "Skies" and "sunrise" rhyme and inform readers that the sun rises in the sky. 

c. The lines that rhyme contrast the darkness of night with the lightness of dawn. 

d. "Day start" and "nature's art" rhyme and show readers that morning is beautiful. 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 8, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.5 - Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas.

RL.7.6 - Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RL.7.8 - Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

SL.7.4 - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.  

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.  

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

I CAN present claims and findings, use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.
  • Quizlet practice
  • Students will complete assessment on skills learned and practiced on this week.
  • Classworks

 

  • Closure - none




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

 

 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 27, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information 

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI. 7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior Knowledge -  

· Students focus closely and critically on content in an informational text.

· Students form a thorough understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.

· Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text is about.

· Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.

· Students understand what it means to draw inferences from a text.

· Students ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text.

· Students utilize an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as the MLA or the APA.

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read a passage and answer the questions/prompt daily.
  • Students will review vocabulary words in preparation for quiz on Tuesday.
  • Students will complete cold read of “Christmas Around the World – Ireland”.  

 

  • Closure - Exit Ticket




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What phrase from the passage helps you determine the meaning of simultaneously?

a. which could send

b. two messages

c. telegraphic system

d. ultimately developing 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 28, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information 

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI. 7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –

· Being able to determine a central idea of a text reflects comprehension of a text.

· A summary should contain only information from the text.

· Personal opinions about a topic or idea should not be included in a summary.

· Personal judgments about a topic or idea should not be included in a summary.

· A student is able to summarize a text.

· A student can identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text. A student can identify the focus of specific paragraphs within a text.

· A student is able to provide a detailed analysis of how a key individual or idea is introduced in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.
  • Students will receive new greek and latin words and vocabulary words. (Test: December 15)
  • Class will work in groups to summarize each paragraph of the passage into one sentence. From that, students will create a short summary of the passage.
  • Classworks 20 minutes

 

  • Closure - exit ticket




Homework

 Complete questions 1-5 for homework

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the meaning of the phrase set it aside as it is used in the sentence?

a. discard it 

b. contain it within fencing

c. prevent it from being enjoyed

d. reserve it for a special purpose 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 29, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI. 7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –

· A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is illustrated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)

· A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)

· Illustrate means to explain, describe, or give example of an individual, event, or idea.

· Elaborate means to provide more details about an individual, event, or idea or individual, event, or idea.

· An example is something that is mentioned in a text to help explain, illustrate or clarify a concept for readers.

· An anecdote is a short narrative that is often presented in an informational text to assist readers in comprehending the text.

· A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas based on specific information in the text.

· A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.

· A student is able to explain procedures in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

· A student can describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.

· A student can use language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.  
  • Students will review vocabulary words and greek and latin roots by playing "Flashcards" on Quizlet. 
  • Class will review answers to questions 1-5 completed for homework  
  • Questions 6-8 will be completed in groups and turned in for a grade.
  • Classworks 20 min.

 

  • Closure - exit ticket




Homework


none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the word relish mean in the poem?

a. to resent

b. to enjoy in full

c. to remember

d. to be frightened by 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 30, 2017  Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information 

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI. 7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Prior Knowledge –

· Students use context clues to determine what a word means in a given context (e.g., figurative, connotative).

· Determine the connotative meaning of particular words and phrases based on context

· Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.

· An exaggeration describes something as being greater, larger, more important, etc., than it really is - an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.

· A metaphor compares two unlike things to illuminate aparticular quality or aspect of one of the two things. Metaphors directly state that one thing is something else and do not use the words like or as.

· A simile compares two unlike things using like or as to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things.

· Figurative meanings refer to words and phrases meant to be interpreted beyond the literal meaning of the word or words.

· Literal language means exactly what the word or word say; whereas, nonliteral or figurative language does not mean exactly what the word or words say, but instead uses comparison or emphasis to imply something different.

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt .
  • Students will review vocabulary and greek/latin roots by playing “Gravity” on Quizlet. 
  • Citing Textual Evidence Lesson 3
  • Classworks 20 min

 

  • Closure – exit ticket




Homework

handwriting worksheet

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the poem's form affect meaning in this stanza?

a. The rhyming second and fourth lines focus attention on the colors in the sky. 

b. "Skies" and "sunrise" rhyme and inform readers that the sun rises in the sky. 

c. The lines that rhyme contrast the darkness of night with the lightness of dawn. 

d. "Day start" and "nature's art" rhyme and show readers that morning is beautiful. 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: December 1, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI. 7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the daily passage and answer the questions/prompt.
  • Students will complete assessment on skills learned and practiced on this week.
  • Classworks can be worked on if students finish early. 

 

  • Closure - none




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

 

Teacher: Dillont Date: November 13, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and tone. 

RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

RL.7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium. 

SL.7.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text. 

I CAN analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

I CAN compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to another version of the text. 

I CAN adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • · Specific word choice helps to achieve particular effects in a text and feelings in the reader.
  • · Figurative language helps to achieve particular effects in a text and in the reader.
  • · Connotation refers to a reader’s emotion or association connected with a word.
  • · Personification is a figure of speech in which a thing, idea, or animal is given human qualities.
  • · How to use context clue to determine what a word means in a given context.
  • · Tone is the author’s attitude toward the audience, the subject, or the character. Tone is conveyed through the author’s words and details.
  • · Mood is the emotions the reader feels while reading a text. Mood is created by the author’s word choice, imagery, dialogue, setting, and plot. Readers determine tone and mood of a text clues presented in the context.
  • · Tone or mood may change throughout a text. In effect, a text can have more than one tone or mood.
  • · Authors often use figurative language to assist in developing the tone or mood of a text.
  • · Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.
  • · A metaphor compares two unlike things to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things. Metaphors directly state that one thing is something else and do not use the words like or as.
  • · A simile compares two unlike things using like or as to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things.
  • · An exaggeration is an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.
  • · Students know that some words used by authors allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
  • · Figurative meanings refer to words and phrases meant to be interpreted beyond the literal meaning of the word or words.
  • · Literal language means exactly what the word or word say; whereas, nonliteral or figurative language does not mean exactly what the word or words say, but instead uses comparison or emphasis to imply something different.
  • · Students know that words and phrases (regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) provide rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.
  • · How to identify words and phrases that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the passage "Where Lovers Dream" and answer the questions/prompt daily. The passage will eventually be used in combination with "The Raven" to compare and contrast structure, theme, and central idea. 
  • Students will be introduced to their new vocabulary and greek and latin root words and will spend 10 minutes on quizlet getting familiar with them. 
  • Students will do a cold read of "The Raven" while annotating the text for unfamiliar words, examples of figurative language, and notating how the structure contributes to the meaning. 

 

  • Closure - Exit Ticket - give an example of figurative language you found while reading "The Raven". 




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What phrase from the passage helps you determine the meaning of simultaneously?

a. which could send

b. two messages

c. telegraphic system

d. ultimately developing 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 14, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and tone. 

RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

RL.7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium. 

SL.7.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text. 

I CAN analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

I CAN compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to another version of the text. 

I CAN adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • · Writers purposely include specific sentences, chapters, scenes, or stanzas that contribute to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
  • · Knowledge of common narrative structure provides support for organizing ideas and deepening understanding of the text.
  • · Common narrative structure follows the elements of plot: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution.
  • · Stories may be presented through common narrative structure, through common narrative structure without conflict, with flashbacks,  through multiple character perspectives, or with stories within stories.
  • · Students explain how specific chapters fit together to provide the overall structure of a story; specific scenes fit together to provide the overall structure of a drama; specific stanzas fit together to provide the overall structure of a poem.
  • · Students know the structural elements of poems, dramas, and prose and can refer to specific elements in writing and speaking.
  • · How to describe how each successive part of a poem, drama, or story builds on earlier sections. 
  • · A narrator or speaker’s point of view influences how events are presented and affects the information revealed about the characters and events.
  • · How to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator’s point of view or other characters’ point of view.
  • · Point of view is the perspective from which the story is presented.
  • · There are three major types of point of view: first person, second person, and third person.
  • · Third person point of view consists of three differing forms: third person omniscient, third person limited, and third person objective.
  • · Students notice the differences in the points of view of characters by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue.
  • · How to identify who is telling a story at different points in a text.
  • · Students know that authors tell the story in writing and illustrators provide pictures of different scenes in a story

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the passage "Where Lovers Dream" and answer the questions/prompt daily. The passage will eventually be used in combination with "The Raven" to compare and contrast structure, theme, and central idea. 
  • Students will review vocabulary and greek and latin roots by doing flip flash cards on quizlet. 
  • Class will begin close read of "The Raven" and read pg. 1 and 2. Students will annotate while reading. 

 

  • Closure - exit ticket - Why do you think Edgar Allan Poe refers to Greek gods and goddesses so much?




Homework

 Complete questions 1-5 for homework 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the meaning of the phrase set it aside as it is used in the sentence?

a. discard it 

b. contain it within fencing

c. prevent it from being enjoyed

d. reserve it for a special purpose 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 15, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature/ Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and tone. 

RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

RL.7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium. 

SL.7.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text. 

I CAN analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

I CAN compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to another version of the text. 

I CAN adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • · Compare and contrast reading the text of a story, drama, or poem to listening or viewing a performed version, describing how each version affects the reader or viewer differently (e.g., explain whether the suspense is greater in the written or performed version of the text).
  • · How to describe the differences in a written story or drama and a performed story or drama.
  • · How to explain how a performed story or drama represents a version of the written story or drama.
  • · Students understand that to compare and contrast, they must show both similarities and differences. 
  • · Visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text.
  • · How to make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the same story or drama, noting where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.
  • · How to show how a text’s illustrations contribute to what is expressed in words in a story.
  • · Students use illustrations and words in a print or digital text to show understanding of a story’s characters, setting, or plot.  

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the passage "Where Lovers Dream" and answer the questions/prompt daily. The passage will eventually be used in combination with "The Raven" to compare and contrast structure, theme, and central idea. 
  • Students will review vocabulary words and greek and latin roots by playing "Gravity" on Quizlet. 
  • Class will continue close reading "The Raven" pages 3 and 4. Students will annotate while reading. 
  • Questions 1-4 will be reviewed after homework is checked and 5-10 will be completed in groups. 

 

  • Closure - exit ticket - We have had the word ominous many times this year in several different texts. How is this word different now in this text than how it is normally used? 




Homework


none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the word relish mean in the poem?

a. to resent

b. to enjoy in full

c. to remember

d. to be frightened by 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 16, 2017  Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature/ Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and tone. 

RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

RL.7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium. 

SL.7.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text. 

I CAN analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

I CAN compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to another version of the text. 

I CAN adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • · Language should be adjusted depending on whom he or she is speaking to and the specific occasion, context or task.
  • · How to determine if formal or informal English is appropriate in a given setting and audience.
  • · How to identify formal and informal settings.
  • · The qualities of formal and informal speech.
  • · How to differentiate between contexts or situations that call for formal English and contexts or situations where informal English is appropriate.
  • · How to speak in complete sentence when asked to provide requested details, information, or clarification.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the passage "Where Lovers Dream" and answer the questions/prompt daily. The passage will eventually be used in combination with "The Raven" to compare and contrast structure, theme, and central idea. 
  • Students will review vocabulary and greek/latin roots by playing gravity on Quizlet. 
  • Citing Textual Evidence Lesson 3
  • Students will complete discussion questions on "The Raven" for a grade. Students will keep in mind the RACE strategy and the skills learned from all 3 Citing Textual Evidence lessons. The grading rubric will be used for written responses. 

 

  • Closure - none




Homework

handwriting worksheet

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the poem's form affect meaning in this stanza?

a. The rhyming second and fourth lines focus attention on the colors in the sky. 

b. "Skies" and "sunrise" rhyme and inform readers that the sun rises in the sky. 

c. The lines that rhyme contrast the darkness of night with the lightness of dawn. 

d. "Day start" and "nature's art" rhyme and show readers that morning is beautiful. 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 17, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice on meaning and tone. 

RL.7.5 Analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

RL.7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium. 

SL.7.6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text. 

I CAN analyze how a drama's or poem's form or structure contributes to its meaning. 

I CAN compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to another version of the text. 

I CAN adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will read the passage "Where Lovers Dream" and answer the questions/prompt daily. The passage will eventually be used in combination with "The Raven" to compare and contrast structure, theme, and central idea. 
  • Students will complete STAR assessment for progress monitoring. 
  • Classworks can be worked on if students finish early. 

 

  • Closure - none




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 6, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · How to focus closely and critically on content in a literary text.
  • · How to form a comprehensive understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • · How to cite evidence from the text in the form of specific details or examples to support an analysis of what the text says explicitly.
  • · How to cite evidence from the text in the form of specific details or examples to support an analysis of inferences drawn from the text.
  • · How to refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what happens in the text.
  • · How to refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • · What it means to draw inferences from a text.
  • · How to ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • · How to an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as those from the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).

 

  • Activities/Centers 
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Citing textual evidence Lesson 2 - cooperative learning activity
  • Greek/Latin and Vocabulary word introduction
  • Students will work in pairs to do a Venn Diagram on the narrator vs. Edgar Allan Poe himself. Students will find similarities and differences in the two. Will be reviewed in whole group. 

 

  • Closure - What is one of the major similarities between Edgar Allan Poe and the narrator of "Tell-Tale Heart"?




Homework

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Part A

What inference can you make about the poet after reading "Sonnet for Morning"? 

a. The poet is impatient.

b. The poet finds darkness refreshing.

c. The poet prefers daytime to night. 

d. The poet often watches the sunrise in the morning. 

 

Part B 

Which line from the poem supports the answer to part A? 

a. I bring a blanket out to watch the skies. 

b. For sweet renewal by the rising light. 

c. Where just before the dark had ruled instead. 

d. I exhale all my stiff, old air and seize.  

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 7, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact.

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • · A central idea of a literary work is what the text is mostly about in its entirety and/or in various sentences, paragraphs or sections.
  • · A theme is an element of a literary work that conveys a widespread and enduring message about life or human nature; readers often apply themes found in literary works to their own lives.
  • · A literary work often contains multiple themes.
  • · A literary work often contains both major themes and minor themes.
  • · A major theme is a message that a writer usually repeats in a literary work; whereas, a minor theme is a message that appears only briefly in a literary work and concedes to other, often more prominent, themes.
  • · A theme of a literary work may be stated explicitly or may be implied, requiring students to draw inferences to determine a theme.
  • · Determining a theme by drawing inferences requires students to attend closely to word choice, characterization, plot, figurative language, stylistic devices and other literary devices presented by the author.
  • · Themes are often revealed by how the characters respond to challenges or by how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic.
  • · Themes are present in novels, short stories, dramas, poems, fables, folktales, and myths.
  • · The way authors express themes may vary according to the genre of literature.
  • · Fables, folktales, and myths communicate central messages, lessons, and/or morals as themes.
  • · The subject of a literary text and a theme of a literary text, although related, are two different concepts: the subject of the text is a topic (e. g. war), while the theme of the text communicates the author’s message about the topic (e.g., War is a plague for humanity).
  • · A summary is a compilation of the main events in a literary text. It is chronologically structured, includes the central idea or theme, and refers to the main story elements.
  • · A summary should be free from personal opinions or judgments.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • 4 1/2 week assessment 

 

  • Closure - none




Homework

Write a sentence for each greek/latin definition and vocabulary definition. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the author organize the information provided in the text?

a. The first part describes Egypt's hills and the second part describes the river valley.

b. The first half describes Egypt's monotony and the second half describes its beauty. 

c. The first half describes Egypt's geography and the second half describes its history. 

d. The first part describes Egypt in the morning and the second part describes it in the evening. 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 8, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact.

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A narrator or speaker’s point of view influences how events are presented and affects the information revealed about the characters and events.
  • How to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator’s point of view or other characters’ point of view.
  • Point of view is the perspective from which the story is presented.
  • There are three major types of point of view: first person, second person, and third person.
  • Third person point of view consists of three differing forms: third person omniscient, third person limited, and third person objective.
  • Students notice the differences in the points of view of characters by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue.
  • How to identify who is telling a story at different points in a text.
  • Students know that authors tell the story in writing and illustrators provide pictures of different scenes in a story. 

 

  • Activities/Centers 
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Students will complete Classworks Benchmark Assessment/Classworks work if Benchmark Assessment has already been completed
  • Any students who have not presented their word for Dead Word Funeral will present. 

 

  • Closure - none




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Describe how Paravi and Thuy's point of view about working with toddlers changes from the beginning of the story to the end of the story. Use details from the text to support your answer. 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 9, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact.

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Multiple texts in different literary genres may address similar themes or topics.
  • Reading multiple literary texts addressing a similar theme or topic exposes students to multiple perspectives and points of view.
  • A specific genre influences the way information is presented in a text.
  • Students know how to describe and analyze aspects of the setting to explain how the setting affects the plot and characters.
  • Authors use situational literary archetypes in a variety of literary genres (e.g., journey, the initiation, good vs. evil, the fall). To compare and contrast, students must show both similarities and differences.
  • How to compare and contrast how stories within a particular genre deal with similar themes and topics.
  • Common literary character archetypes (e.g., the hero, the mother figure, the innocent youth, the doppelganger, the villain, the scapegoat) are often used by authors to develop characters.
  • Similar themes, topics, and patterns of events are found in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.
  • Authors often continue writing about characters they have developed through books in a series. In the series, authors may choose to alter the theme, setting, characters and/or plot of the books.
  • Multiple versions of the same story can be presented bydifferent authors or from different cultures.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Students will get into pairs and complete a performance based assessment on Tell-Tale Heart. 1st, 2nd, and 3rd period will complete a task card to assess their knowledge and understanding of the text. 5th and 6th period will complete a medical assessment of their client (narrator) and diagnose their client with one or more mental disorders, then write a letter to the court stating their findings to either approve or disapprove of the insanity plea of the client. 

 

  • Closure -none




Homework

Handwriting worksheet 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Describe how the events that modern athletes compete in are different from those that took place in the Olympic Games of ancient Greece. Use details from both "The Story of Today's Olympics" and "Big Changes Since Ancient Greece" to support your answer. 



 

Teacher: Dillon Date: November 10, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact.

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Turn in final copy of performance based assessment on Tell-Tale Heart. 
  • Students will complete Common Lit quiz on "Tell-Tale Heart"
  • Closure




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: October 30, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · How to focus closely and critically on content in a literary text.
  • · How to form a comprehensive understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • · How to cite evidence from the text in the form of specific details or examples to support an analysis of what the text says explicitly.
  • · How to cite evidence from the text in the form of specific details or examples to support an analysis of inferences drawn from the text.
  • · How to refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what happens in the text.
  • · How to refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • · What it means to draw inferences from a text.
  • · How to ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • · How to an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as those from the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).

 

  • Activities/Centers 
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Discussion on citing textual evidence and notes
  • Greek/Latin and Vocabulary quizlet practice 
  • Class will continue close read of Tell-Tale Heart. Students work together in groups to complete questions 5 and 6. Answers will be discussed in class. 

 

  • Closure - What genre is The Tell-Tale Heart?




Homework

Complete eulogy and placard for the Dead Word Funeral. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Part A

What inference can you make about the poet after reading "Sonnet for Morning"? 

a. The poet is impatient.

b. The poet finds darkness refreshing.

c. The poet prefers daytime to night. 

d. The poet often watches the sunrise in the morning. 

 

Part B 

Which line from the poem supports the answer to part A? 

a. I bring a blanket out to watch the skies. 

b. For sweet renewal by the rising light. 

c. Where just before the dark had ruled instead. 

d. I exhale all my stiff, old air and seize.  

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: October 31, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • · A central idea of a literary work is what the text is mostly about in its entirety and/or in various sentences, paragraphs or sections.
  • · A theme is an element of a literary work that conveys a widespread and enduring message about life or human nature; readers often apply themes found in literary works to their own lives.
  • · A literary work often contains multiple themes.
  • · A literary work often contains both major themes and minor themes.
  • · A major theme is a message that a writer usually repeats in a literary work; whereas, a minor theme is a message that appears only briefly in a literary work and concedes to other, often more prominent, themes.
  • · A theme of a literary work may be stated explicitly or may be implied, requiring students to draw inferences to determine a theme.
  • · Determining a theme by drawing inferences requires students to attend closely to word choice, characterization, plot, figurative language, stylistic devices and other literary devices presented by the author.
  • · Themes are often revealed by how the characters respond to challenges or by how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic.
  • · Themes are present in novels, short stories, dramas, poems, fables, folktales, and myths.
  • · The way authors express themes may vary according to the genre of literature.
  • · Fables, folktales, and myths communicate central messages, lessons, and/or morals as themes.
  • · The subject of a literary text and a theme of a literary text, although related, are two different concepts: the subject of the text is a topic (e. g. war), while the theme of the text communicates the author’s message about the topic (e.g., War is a plague for humanity).
  • · A summary is a compilation of the main events in a literary text. It is chronologically structured, includes the central idea or theme, and refers to the main story elements.
  • · A summary should be free from personal opinions or judgments.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Students will participate in the dead word funeral. They chose a word from a list of weak or overused words. They then created a eulogy for that word. These words will no longer be used in our writing throughout the year. Students will wear black or dress in nice attire and will read their eulogy to the class. 

 

  • Closure - Name 3 dead words you will no longer be using in your class. 




Homework

Write a sentence for each greek/latin definition and vocabulary definition. (9 sentences total)

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the author organize the information provided in the text?

a. The first part describes Egypt's hills and the second part describes the river valley.

b. The first half describes Egypt's monotony and the second half describes its beauty. 

c. The first half describes Egypt's geography and the second half describes its history. 

d. The first part describes Egypt in the morning and the second part describes it in the evening. 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: November 1, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A narrator or speaker’s point of view influences how events are presented and affects the information revealed about the characters and events.
  • How to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator’s point of view or other characters’ point of view.
  • Point of view is the perspective from which the story is presented.
  • There are three major types of point of view: first person, second person, and third person.
  • Third person point of view consists of three differing forms: third person omniscient, third person limited, and third person objective.
  • Students notice the differences in the points of view of characters by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue.
  • How to identify who is telling a story at different points in a text.
  • Students know that authors tell the story in writing and illustrators provide pictures of different scenes in a story. 

 

  • Activities/Centers (Teacher will be out) 
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Students will complete the endurance test on Readworks.org, then complete Classworks when finished. 

 

  • Closure - none




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Describe how Paravi and Thuy's point of view about working with toddlers changes from the beginning of the story to the end of the story. Use details from the text to support your answer. 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: November 2, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Multiple texts in different literary genres may address similar themes or topics.
  • Reading multiple literary texts addressing a similar theme or topic exposes students to multiple perspectives and points of view.
  • A specific genre influences the way information is presented in a text.
  • Students know how to describe and analyze aspects of the setting to explain how the setting affects the plot and characters.
  • Authors use situational literary archetypes in a variety of literary genres (e.g., journey, the initiation, good vs. evil, the fall). To compare and contrast, students must show both similarities and differences.
  • How to compare and contrast how stories within a particular genre deal with similar themes and topics.
  • Common literary character archetypes (e.g., the hero, the mother figure, the innocent youth, the doppelganger, the villain, the scapegoat) are often used by authors to develop characters.
  • Similar themes, topics, and patterns of events are found in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.
  • Authors often continue writing about characters they have developed through books in a series. In the series, authors may choose to alter the theme, setting, characters and/or plot of the books.
  • Multiple versions of the same story can be presented bydifferent authors or from different cultures.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Students will complete a character analysis on the narrator in "Tell-Tale Heart" and write it on the left side of their venn diagram. They will then search on Magnolia database for information on Edgar Allan Poe and record information on the right side. They will find similarities to put in the middle of the chart. 

 

  • Closure - exit ticket
  • Give one example of how Edgar Allan Poe's real life may have influenced his storyline in Tell-Tale Heart. 




Homework

Handwriting worksheet ; study for test

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Describe how the events that modern athletes compete in are different from those that took place in the Olympic Games of ancient Greece. Use details from both "The Story of Today's Olympics" and "Big Changes Since Ancient Greece" to support your answer. 



 

Teacher: Abbott Date: November 3, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.6 - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

RL.7.9 - Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text.

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

I CAN analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

I CAN compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Greek/Latin quiz on "phob" and "phon" 
  • Test on Tell-Tale Heart 

 

  • Closure




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

Teacher: Dillon Date: October 25, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicity as well as inferences drawn. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · How to focus closely and critically on content in a literary text.
  • · How to form a comprehensive understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • · How to cite evidence from the text in the form of specific details or examples to support an analysis of what the text says explicitly.
  • · How to cite evidence from the text in the form of specific details or examples to support an analysis of inferences drawn from the text.
  • · How to refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what happens in the text.
  • · How to refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • · What it means to draw inferences from a text.
  • · How to ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • · How to an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as those from the Modern Language Association (MLA) or the American Psychological Association (APA).

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will finish working on test from Friday (30 min)
  • Students will cold-read Tell-Tale Heart while annotating. Students will circle words they don't know, underline figurative language, and write any questions they have in the margins. (20 min) 
  • New Greek and Latin and vocabulary words will be introduced. (10 min)

 

  • Closure - What type of story is Tell-Tale Heart?




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





3. PART A: Which of the following finally drives the narrator to murder the old man?

A. The old man’s blue eye

B. The sound of a heart beating beneath the floorboards

C. The narrator’s unstable mental health

D. The narrator’s sensitive hearing exacerbated by the old man’s heartbeat

 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: October 26, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicity as well as inferences drawn. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · A central idea of a literary work is what the text is mostly about in its entirety and/or in various sentences, paragraphs or sections.
  • · A theme is an element of a literary work that conveys a widespread and enduring message about life or human nature; readers often apply themes found in literary works to their own lives.
  • · A literary work often contains multiple themes.
  • · A literary work often contains both major themes and minor themes.
  • · A major theme is a message that a writer usually repeats in a literary work; whereas, a minor theme is a message that appears only briefly in a literary work and concedes to other, often more prominent, themes.
  • · A theme of a literary work may be stated explicitly or may be implied, requiring students to draw inferences to determine a theme.
  • · Determining a theme by drawing inferences requires students to attend closely to word choice, characterization, plot, figurative language, stylistic devices and other literary devices presented by the author.
  • · Themes are often revealed by how the characters respond to challenges or by how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic.
  • · Themes are present in novels, short stories, dramas, poems, fables, folktales, and myths.
  • · The way authors express themes may vary according to the genre of literature.
  • · Fables, folktales, and myths communicate central messages, lessons, and/or morals as themes.
  • · The subject of a literary text and a theme of a literary text, although related, are two different concepts: the subject of the text is a topic (e. g. war), while the theme of the text communicates the author’s message about the topic (e.g., War is a plague for humanity).
  • · A summary is a compilation of the main events in a literary text. It is chronologically structured, includes the central idea or theme, and refers to the main story elements.
  • · A summary should be free from personal opinions or judgments.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min)
  • Classworks (20 min) 
  • Teacher will teach a lesson on citing textual evidence and students will be given notes. (15-20 min)

 

  • Closure - Students will answer a question citing textual evidence from the story. 




Homework

Answer questions 1-4 on Tell-Tale Heart. Write one sentence for each vocabulary word and greek and latin definition. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





2. PART B: Which of the following quotes provides the best support for the answer to Part A?

A. “Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees—very gradually—I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye for ever.” (Paragraph 2)

B. “Yes, he has been trying to comfort himself with these suppositions; but he had found all in vain. All in vain; because Death, in approaching him, had stalked with his black shadow before him, and enveloped the victim.” (Paragraph 7)

C. "As the bell sounded the hour, there came a knocking at the street door. I went down to open it with a light heart,—for what had I now to fear?” (Paragraph 14)

D. "'I admit the deed!—tear up the planks!—here, here!—it is the beating of his hideous heart!'" (Paragraph 18)

 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: October 27, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Literature 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2. - Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis. 

RL.7.3 - Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicity as well as inferences drawn. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · How to describe how a plot unfolds.
  • · How to describe how characters respond to challenges over the course of a text.
  • · How to describe how characters change over the course of a text.
  • · Characters in a literary text interact through dialogue and actions.
  • · How to compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events, citing specific details from a literary text.
  • · How to describe in detail a character, setting, or event, citing specific evidence from a literary text.
  • · How to describe characters and explain how the characters’ traits, motivations, or feelings contribute to the events in the story.
  • · How to describe how characters respond to major events and challenges using key details from a literary text.
  • · How to explain how key events advance the plot of a literary text.

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Students will complete a CHOMP bellringer that quickly reviews the reading standards for the week and targets other standards that will be covered throughout the year. Students should answer: What is the theme? What is the central idea? for each passage given on the CHOMP. (10-15 min) 
  • Students will get in groups and receive a set of questions that will require them to cite textual evidence. They will work together to answer questions on Tell-Tale Heart using the skills they learned from yesterday's lesson. Group work record sheets will be collected for a grade. 

 

  • Closure - Write one thing you learned this week about citing textual evidence. 




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





1. PART A: Which of the following best identifies the major themes of the story?

A. Morality and justice

B. Guilt and conscience

C. Prejudice and fear

D. Truth and perception

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 16, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Writing/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






W.7.2 Write informative /explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN write informative/explanatory texts.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing as needed.

I CAN demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English.

I CAN use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

I CAN demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

I CAN acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Activities/Centers -
  • GRADE READY ASSESSMENT (whole class period)

 




Homework

 None

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Read the following sentence from the article: “He wrote a thesis describing the best pedagogy to teach students chess.” What does “pedagogy” mean?

 

 

Competitive success

Thorough repetition

Philosophy of teaching

Gaming

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 17, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Writing/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






W.7.2 Write informative /explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN write informative/explanatory texts.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing as needed.

I CAN demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English.

I CAN use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

I CAN demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

I CAN acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Activities/Centers –
  • GRADE READY ASSESSMENT (whole class period)
  • Classworks if time permits

 




Homework

Complete questions for Three Skeleton Key

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does it mean to say that success is “environmental,” not “biological?”

 

Success depends on which national culture you were born into.

Success is in your genes and you have to bring it out.

Chess is more a woman’s game than most people believe.

The way society treats people greatly influences the possibility of success.

 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 18, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Writing/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






W.7.2 Write informative /explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN write informative/explanatory texts.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing as needed.

I CAN demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English.

I CAN use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

I CAN demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

I CAN acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Procedures (with general times)







 

    • Prior knowledge
    • Writers purposely include specific sentences, chapters, scenes, or stanzas that contribute to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
    • · Knowledge of common narrative structure provides support for organizing ideas and deepening understanding of the text.
    • · Common narrative structure follows the elements of plot: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution.
    • · Stories may be presented through common narrative structure, through common narrative structure without conflict, with flashbacks through multiple character perspectives, or with stories within stories.
    • · Students explain how specific chapters fit together to provide the overall structure of a story; specific scenes fit together to provide the overall structure of a drama; specific stanzas fit together to provide the overall structure of a poem.
    • · Students know the structural elements of poems, dramas, and prose and can refer to specific elements in writing and speaking.
    • · How to describe how each successive part of a poem, drama, or story builds on earlier sections. 

 

  • Activities/Centers –
  • Students will complete a daily language spiral review and a CHOMP bellringer in groups. These activities provide a comprehensive review of all standards for writing/reading for information/reading for literature/language for the year. (15 min)
  • Students will complete a graphic organizer on how the author of “Three Skeleton Key” builds suspense in the story in groups, making sure that any evidence they find is listed on the graphic organizer with page numbers. (30 min)
  • Classworks (20 min)

 

  • Closure – What was one way George Toudouze created suspense in Three Skeleton Key?




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





“How did the author use layout and graphic design to get your attention and communicate clearly? What do you notice (about the use of headings, color, graphics, and the placement of text and objects)?”

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 19, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Writing/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






W.7.2 Write informative /explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN write informative/explanatory texts.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing as needed.

I CAN demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English.

I CAN use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

I CAN demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

I CAN acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Procedures (with general times)







 

o    Prior knowledge Specific word choice helps to achieve particular effects in a text and feelings in the reader.

o    · Figurative language helps to achieve particular effects in a text and in the reader.

o    · Connotation refers to a reader’s emotion or association connected with a word.

o    · Personification is a figure of speech in which a thing, idea, or animal is given human qualities.

o    · How to use context clue to determine what a word means in a given context.

o    · Tone is the author’s attitude toward the audience, the subject, or the character. Tone is conveyed through the author’s words and details.

o    · Mood is the emotions the reader feels while reading a text. Mood is created by the author’s word choice, imagery, dialogue, setting, and plot. Readers determine tone and mood of a text clues presented in the context.

o    · Tone or mood may change throughout a text. In effect, a text can have more than one tone or mood.

o    · Authors often use figurative language to assist in developing the tone or mood of a text.

o    · Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.

o    · A metaphor compares two unlike things to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things. Metaphors directly state that one thing is something else and do not use the words like or as.

o    · A simile compares two unlike things using like or as to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things.

o    · An exaggeration is an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.

o    · Students know that some words used by authors allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

o    · Figurative meanings refer to words and phrases meant to be interpreted beyond the literal meaning of the word or words.

o    · Literal language means exactly what the word or word say; whereas, nonliteral or figurative language does not mean exactly what the word or words say, but instead uses comparison or emphasis to imply something different.

o    · Students know that words and phrases (regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) provide rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

  • Activities/Centers -
  • Students will complete a daily language spiral review and a CHOMP bellringer in groups. These activities provide a comprehensive review of all standards for writing/reading for information/reading for literature/language for the year. (15 min)
  • Students will begin writing assignment. Students will write an analysis of the short story that explains how setting and plot events escalate the suspense for readers using graphic organizer completed in class yesterday. (Remainder of class)
  • Closure




Homework

Complete final copy of writing assignment.

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Write an essay for your school newspaper arguing whether playing video games significantly affects physical health. Your essay must be based on the ideas, concepts, and information that can be determined through analysis of the “Do Video Games Have a Major Effect on Players’ Physical Health?” passage set.

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 20, 2017 Subject: ELA Topic: Writing/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






W.7.2 Write informative /explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

W.7.5 With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3 Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

L.7.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

SL.7.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN write informative/explanatory texts.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing as needed.

I CAN demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English.

I CAN use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

I CAN demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

I CAN acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues.

Procedures (with general times)







 

 

  • Activities/Centers –
  • Greek/Latin quiz
  • Test on “Three Skeleton Key”

 




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Your social studies class is researching both traditional and unexpected heroes. Using the information and examples found in the “Courage and Heroism” passage set, write an informative essay on what it means to be courageous.

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 9, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

o    Specific word choice helps to achieve particular effects in a text and feelings in the reader.

o    · Figurative language helps to achieve particular effects in a text and in the reader.

o    · Connotation refers to a reader’s emotion or association connected with a word.

o    · Personification is a figure of speech in which a thing, idea, or animal is given human qualities.

o    · How to use context clue to determine what a word means in a given context.

o    · Tone is the author’s attitude toward the audience, the subject, or the character. Tone is conveyed through the author’s words and details.

o    · Mood is the emotions the reader feels while reading a text. Mood is created by the author’s word choice, imagery, dialogue, setting, and plot. Readers determine tone and mood of a text clues presented in the context.

o    · Tone or mood may change throughout a text. In effect, a text can have more than one tone or mood.

o    · Authors often use figurative language to assist in developing the tone or mood of a text.

o    · Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.

o    · A metaphor compares two unlike things to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things. Metaphors directly state that one thing is something else and do not use the words like or as.

o    · A simile compares two unlike things using like or as to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things.

o    · An exaggeration is an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.

o    · Students know that some words used by authors allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).

o    · Figurative meanings refer to words and phrases meant to be interpreted beyond the literal meaning of the word or words.

o    · Literal language means exactly what the word or word say; whereas, nonliteral or figurative language does not mean exactly what the word or words say, but instead uses comparison or emphasis to imply something different.

o    · Students know that words and phrases (regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) provide rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

o     

· How to identify words and phrases that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. 

 

  • Activities/Centers 
  • Students will review 9 weeks test in groups, particularly the written responses. For question 18, students will make a list of steps giving directions on how to measure the height of a mountain using GPS. For question 22, students will look at the opposing views of recess. Students will list 3 supporting details from the passage to support their view of whether or not recess is beneficial to students. If time permits, each group will rewrite a response to questions 18 and 22. 

  


Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





RL.7.4 How does the poem's form affect meaning in this stanza?

a. The rhyming second and fourth lines focus attention on the colors in the sky at sunrise. 

b. "Skies" and "sunrise" rhyme and inform readers that the sun rises in the sky.

c. The lines that rhyme contrast the darkness of night with the lightness of dawn.

d. "Day start" and "nature's art" rhyme and show readers that morning is beautiful.



 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 10, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Report Card Pick-up Day 

Homework

Write a sentence with each vocabulary word. (Greek/Latin and Three Skeleton Key words - 23 words total) WILL be due THURSDAY! (Some students did this last week, but those who didn't need to complete it and turn it in.)

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

 



 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 11, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening 

111

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

o    Writers purposely include specific sentences, chapters, scenes, or stanzas that contribute to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

o    · Knowledge of common narrative structure provides support for organizing ideas and deepening understanding of the text.

o    · Common narrative structure follows the elements of plot: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution.

o    · Stories may be presented through common narrative structure, through common narrative structure without conflict, with flashbacks through multiple character perspectives, or with stories within stories.

o    · Students explain how specific chapters fit together to provide the overall structure of a story; specific scenes fit together to provide the overall structure of a drama; specific stanzas fit together to provide the overall structure of a poem.

o    · Students know the structural elements of poems, dramas, and prose and can refer to specific elements in writing and speaking.

o    · How to describe how each successive part of a poem, drama, or story builds on earlier sections. 

 

  •  
  •  
  • Activities/Centers - 
  •  

o    Students will complete a daily language spiral review and a CHOMP bellringer in groups. These activities provide a comprehensive review of all standards for writing/reading for information/reading for literature/language for the year. 

o    Students will read pg. 32 - 36 in whole group, keeping setting and theme in mind. 

o    With this activity, students are required to look back at the text and analyze the setting. They must find details that describe the place, time, and environment. Then, they must explain how certain passages and words affect the characters in the story. 

  •  
  •  
  •  

 

  • Closure - Choose one character from "Three Skeleton Key" and make a prediction about what will happen to that character by the end of the story. 




Homework

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





RL.7.5 What does the word relish mean as it is used in the poem?

a. to resent

b. to enjoy in full

c. to remember

d. to be frightened by

 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 12, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

o    Writers purposely include specific sentences, chapters, scenes, or stanzas that contribute to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.

o    · Knowledge of common narrative structure provides support for organizing ideas and deepening understanding of the text.

o    · Common narrative structure follows the elements of plot: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution.

o    · Stories may be presented through common narrative structure, through common narrative structure without conflict, with flashbacks through multiple character perspectives, or with stories within stories.

o    · Students explain how specific chapters fit together to provide the overall structure of a story; specific scenes fit together to provide the overall structure of a drama; specific stanzas fit together to provide the overall structure of a poem.

o    · Students know the structural elements of poems, dramas, and prose and can refer to specific elements in writing and speaking.

· 

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Students will complete a daily language spiral review and a CHOMP bellringer in groups. These activities provide a comprehensive review of all standards for writing/reading for information/reading for literature/language for the year. 
  • Students will read in whole group, pages 37-41 of Three Skeleton Key. 
  • Students will receive notes on Theme and Universal Theme Concepts. 
  • In groups, students will select a theme for the Three Skeleton Key, and complete the Theme Chart. The theme chosen will be used to make a theme statement. 

 

  • Closure - What theme did you choose from the list and why?




Homework


handwriting worksheets 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





RL.7.6 Which of the following details from the text support the idea that Gina does not want to go on the trip? Check the box next to each detail you choose. 

- dreaded the thought

- slamming the door shut 

- anticipating the imminent flurry of activity

- she groused

 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: October 13, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Students will complete the vocabulary quiz for Three Skeleton Key and greek and latin. 
  • Students will complete reading "Three Skeleton Key" in whole group. 
  • Students will complete theme activity in small group. 

 

  • Closure 




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which of the following might be a theme of a story?

 

   



Money



I won the lottery



Love



Money can't buy happiness

 


 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 25, 2017 Subject: LanguageTopic:Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.)

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - none

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Readworks story for 2nd endurance test (30 min)
  • Classworks (30 min)

 

  • Closure - none




Homework


no homework 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 



 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 26, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • Specific word choice helps to achieve particular effects in a text and feelings in the reader.
  • · Figurative language helps to achieve particular effects in a text and in the reader.
  • · Connotation refers to a reader’s emotion or association connected with a word.
  • · Personification is a figure of speech in which a thing, idea, or animal is given human qualities.
  • · How to use context clue to determine what a word means in a given context.
  • · Tone is the author’s attitude toward the audience, the subject, or the character. Tone is conveyed through the author’s words and details.
  • · Mood is the emotions the reader feels while reading a text. Mood is created by the author’s word choice, imagery, dialogue, setting, and plot. Readers determine tone and mood of a text clues presented in the context.
  • · Tone or mood may change throughout a text. In effect, a text can have more than one tone or mood.
  • · Authors often use figurative language to assist in developing the tone or mood of a text.
  • · Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.
  • · A metaphor compares two unlike things to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things. Metaphors directly state that one thing is something else and do not use the words like or as.
  • · A simile compares two unlike things using like or as to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things.
  • · An exaggeration is an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.
  • · Students know that some words used by authors allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean).
  • · Figurative meanings refer to words and phrases meant to be interpreted beyond the literal meaning of the word or words.
  • · Literal language means exactly what the word or word say; whereas, nonliteral or figurative language does not mean exactly what the word or words say, but instead uses comparison or emphasis to imply something different.
  • · Students know that words and phrases (regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) provide rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.
  • · How to identify words and phrases that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses. 

 

  • Activities/Centers - Students will complete a Language Review bellringer and CHOMP activity in groups. These activities are a mixed review of all Language/Reading/Writing standards for 7th grade. 
  • Whole class will read/act out pg. 111-117 of Sorry, Wrong Number from the Collections book. 
  • In groups, students will make a list of characters in the story thus far and will summarize the characters in one sentence/statement. 

 

  • Closure - Exit slip - In lines 16-27, what do Mrs. Stevenson's actions reveal about her physical condition?




Homework


Write a sentence for each greek and latin root definition. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





RL.7.4 How does the poem's form affect meaning in this stanza?

a. The rhyming second and fourth lines focus attention on the colors in the sky at sunrise. 

b. "Skies" and "sunrise" rhyme and inform readers that the sun rises in the sky.

c. The lines that rhyme contrast the darkness of night with the lightness of dawn.

d. "Day start" and "nature's art" rhyme and show readers that morning is beautiful.

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 27, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic:Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • Writers purposely include specific sentences, chapters, scenes, or stanzas that contribute to the development of the theme, setting, or plot.
  • · Knowledge of common narrative structure provides support for organizing ideas and deepening understanding of the text.
  • · Common narrative structure follows the elements of plot: exposition, rising action, climax, falling action, resolution.
  • · Stories may be presented through common narrative structure, through common narrative structure without conflict, with flashbacks through multiple character perspectives, or with stories within stories.
  • · Students explain how specific chapters fit together to provide the overall structure of a story; specific scenes fit together to provide the overall structure of a drama; specific stanzas fit together to provide the overall structure of a poem.
  • · Students know the structural elements of poems, dramas, and prose and can refer to specific elements in writing and speaking.
  • · How to describe how each successive part of a poem, drama, or story builds on earlier sections. 

 

  • Activities/Centers - Students will complete a Language Review bellringer and CHOMP activity in groups. These activities are a mixed review of all Language/Reading/Writing standards for 7th grade.
  • Students will complete the reading of "Sorry, Wrong Number" in class. In groups, students will complete the graphic organizer on pg. 125. 
  • Writing task: (finish on Thursday) Write a three-paragraph character analysis of Mrs. Stevenson. Support your analysis with examples of her actions, answering the following questions: 

1. How does she perceive herself?

2. How does she perceive others?

3. What parts of her personality might have been misunderstood or allow her to be misunderstood?

4. How do her actions affect the drama's plot?

 

  • Closure - exit ticket - How would the story have been different if it hadn't been written as a drama?




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





RL.7.5 What does the word relish mean as it is used in the poem?

a. to resent

b. to enjoy in full

c. to remember

d. to be frightened by

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 28, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • A narrator or speaker’s point of view influences how events are presented and affects the information revealed about the characters and events.
  • · How to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator’s point of view or other characters’ point of view.
  • · Point of view is the perspective from which the story is presented.
  • · There are three major types of point of view: first person, second person, and third person.
  • · Third person point of view consists of three differing forms: third person omniscient, third person limited, and third person objective.
  • · Students notice the differences in the points of view of characters by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue.
  • · How to identify who is telling a story at different points in a text.
  • · Students know that authors tell the story in writing and illustrators provide pictures of different scenes in a story. 

 

  • Activities/Centers - Students will complete a Language Review bellringer and CHOMP activity in groups. These activities are a mixed review of all Language/Reading/Writing standards for 7th grade.
  • Complete writing assignment from Wednesday to be turned in for a grade. 
  • Speaking and Listening task: After watching a clip from the film version of "Sorry, Wrong Number" discuss with a partner how seeing the drama as a film is different than reading it. Discuss the differences between the stage directions and how the director used techniques to create suspense. 

 

  • Closure - Considering the saying "Seeing is believing". How does that apply to this story. 




Homework


Handwriting worksheet

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





RL.7.6 Which of the following details from the text support the idea that Gina does not want to go on the trip? Check the box next to each detail you choose. 

- dreaded the thought

- slamming the door shut 

- anticipating the imminent flurry of activity

- she groused

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 29, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading For Literature/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






(RL.7.4) - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choice (e.g., alliteration) on meaning and tone

(RL.7.5) - Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

(RL.7.6) - Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different characters or narrators in a text. 

(SL.7.2) - Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study.

(SL.7.3) - Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims, evaluating the soundness of the reasoning and the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

(SL.7.4) - Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.

(SL.7.6) - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. (See grade 7 Language standards 1 and 3 for specific expectations.) 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN: 

- Determine the meaning of words or phrases as used in the text. 

- Analyze how a drama's or poem's structure contributes to it's meaning. 

- Analyze how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of characters or narrators of a text. 

- Analyze the main ideas and supporting details presented in diverse media and formats and explain how the ideas clarify a topic, text, or issue under study. 

- Delineate a speaker’s argument and specific claims.

- Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient (most important) points in a focused, coherent manner with pertinent descriptions, facts, details, and examples.

- Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Test on Readworks passage (drama)
  • Greek and Latin quiz 
  • Classworks if finished early 

 

  • Closure




Homework

none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 18, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Texts

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · Students focus closely and critically on content in an informational text.
  • · Students form a thorough understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text is about.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • · Students understand what it means to draw inferences from a text. 
  • Students ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text.
  • · Students utilize an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as the MLA or the APA

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. (15 min)
  • Students will complete Readworks endurance story "The Grime" with questions. (30 min)
  • If time remains, students will log in and begin working on Classworks assignments. 




Homework

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which statement best expresses King's central argument in the text?

a. It is more important to have  timely response to criticism and prejudice than to maintain moral integrity. 

b. The presence of injustice necessitates a nonviolent response in order to repair the harms of prejudice and discrimination. 

c. Peace in the South will only be achieved after white supremacitst are transformed by the white moderate. 

d. The church's role in the civil rights movement continues to create tension and alienate followers. 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 19, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Texts

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · Students focus closely and critically on content in an informational text.
  • · Students form a thorough understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text is about.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • · Students understand what it means to draw inferences from a text. 
  • Students ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text.
  • · Students utilize an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as the MLA or the APA

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. (small group)
  • Students will receive new Greek/Latin roots (Onym, ora, ord/ordin, and para) (small group game)
  • Classworks center (15 min)
  • Students will receive vocabulary words for nonfiction passage "You Can Buy Happiness If It's An Experience" from Commonlit. Words: eons, latter, "keeping up with the Joneses", and aficionados. (small group game)
  • Students will do guided reading of the passage "You Can Buy Happiness If It's An Experience" from Commonlit on chrome books. Guided reading will be done in small group with the teacher. 
  • Exit slip: What makes you happier as a person - experiences or purchases? Why?

 


Homework

Write sentences using Greek/Latin roots/affixes. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which statement best expresses King's central argument in the text?

a. It is more important to have  timely response to criticism and prejudice than to maintain moral integrity. 

b. The presence of injustice necessitates a nonviolent response in order to repair the harms of prejudice and discrimination. 

c. Peace in the South will only be achieved after white supremacitst are transformed by the white moderate. 

d. The church's role in the civil rights movement continues to create tension and alienate followers. 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 20, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Text

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A student is able to provide a detailed analysis of how a key individual or idea is introduced in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • · A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is illustrated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes) · A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes) · Illustrate means to explain, describe, or give example of an individual, event, or idea.
  • · Elaborate means to provide more details about an individual, event, or idea or to further develop an individual, event, or idea.
  • · An example is something that is mentioned in a text to help explain, illustrate or clarify a concept for readers.
  • · An anecdote is a short narrative that is often presented in an informational text to assist readers in comprehending the text.
  • · A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas based on specific information in the text. · A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  • · A student is able to explain procedures in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.  A student can describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.
  • · A student can use language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. (15 min)
  • Review Greek/Latin roots/affixes and vocabulary words (15 min) 
  • Small group with teacher reading "You Can Buy Happiness If It's An Experience"(15 min)
  • Classworks center (15 min)

 

  • Closure - exit ticket - If you could buy an experience, what would it be and why?




Homework

none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What inference can you make about Dorothy in meeting the scarecrow?

a. She is brave. 

b. She is stubborn. 

c. She is lonely. 

d. She is intelligent. 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 21, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Text

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Students use context clues to determine what a word means in a given context (e.g., figurative, connotative).
  • · Determine the connotative meaning of particular words and phrases based on context
  • · Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.
  • · An exaggeration describes something as being greater, larger, more important, etc., than it really is - an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.
  • · A metaphor compares two unlike things to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things. Metaphors directly state that one thing is something else and do not use the words like or as.
  • · A simile compares two unlike things using like or as to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things.
  • · Figurative meanings refer to words and phrases meant to be interpreted beyond the literal meaning of the word or words.
  • · Literal language means exactly what the word or word say; whereas, nonliteral or figurative language does not mean exactly what the word or words say, but instead uses comparison or emphasis to imply something different. 

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. (15 min)
  • Students will review with Greek/Latin roots/affixes and vocabulary words with a game of concentration in groups. (15 min)
  • Answer all questions for "You Can Buy Happiness If It's An Experience" on Commonlit.org in groups. (15 min) 
  • AR reading time (15 min)

 

  • Exit slip - Cite one piece of evidence from the text that makes experiences more joyful than purchases for consumers. 



Homework


Handwriting worksheet

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What is the meaning of the phrase "set it aside" as it is used in the sentence?

a. discard it

b. contain it with fencing

c. prevent it from being enjoyed

d. reserve it for a special purpose

 

Teacher: Abbott/Daniel Date: September 22, 2017 Subject: Language

Topic: Informational Text

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · Trace means to outline, delineate, or describe.
  • · A student should know the difference between a claim that is supported with reasons and evidence opposed to a claim this is unsupported.
  • · A student should know how to identify a speaker’s claim(s) and explain how each claim is supported by the argument or arguments the speaker makes (the evidence).
  • · A student should understand that a speaker uses reasons, facts, statistics, details, etc. to support his or her arguments for a claim or claims. A claim is a statement of opinion the writer or speaker is trying to prove.
  • · Argument(s) is how the speaker supports his claim(s); argument is the main point or points a speaker makes to provide supporting reasons and evidence for his claim. 

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Complete test on Commonlit.org - Paired passages "You Can Buy Happiness If It's An Experience" and "Study: High Incomes Don't Bring You Happiness".

 

  • Closure - none




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 What is the author's point of view about the impact of movies? What information does the author use to support this point of view? Use detail from the text to support your answer. 


 




Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 11, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Texts

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · Students focus closely and critically on content in an informational text.
  • · Students form a thorough understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text is about.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • · Students understand what it means to draw inferences from a text. 
  • Students ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text.
  • · Students utilize an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as the MLA or the APA

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. 
  • Students will continue to read and analyze in class "Letter from Birmingham Jail" pg. 6-8
  • Students will receive a copy of transition words and phrases to use in their writing, as well as a writing rubric based on the state requirements that will be used whenever they turn in a writing assignment. 

 

  • Closure - exit ticket - write from memory 3 of your greek and latin roots/affixes words and their meanings. Use one in a sentence. 




Homework

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which statement best expresses King's central argument in the text?

a. It is more important to have  timely response to criticism and prejudice than to maintain moral integrity. 

b. The presence of injustice necessitates a nonviolent response in order to repair the harms of prejudice and discrimination. 

c. Peace in the South will only be achieved after white supremacitst are transformed by the white moderate. 

d. The church's role in the civil rights movement continues to create tension and alienate followers.

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 12, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Texts

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · Students focus closely and critically on content in an informational text.
  • · Students form a thorough understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text is about.
  • · Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • · Students understand what it means to draw inferences from a text. 
  • Students ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text.
  • · Students utilize an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as the MLA or the APA

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. 
  • Review Greek/Latin roots/affixes words with a game.
  • Students will continue to read and analyze in class "Letter from Birmingham Jail" pg. 9-11
  • Complete questions 4-5 in groups

 

  • Closure - Based on your answers for 4 and 5, provide evidence from your text to support your answer. 




Homework

Write sentences using Greek/Latin roots/affixes. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which statement best expresses King's central argument in the text?

a. It is more importan to have  timely response to criticism and prejudice than to maintain moral integrity. 

b. The presence of injustice necessitates a nonviolent response in order to repair the harms of prejudice and discrimination. 

c. Peace in the South will only be achieved after white supremacitst are transformed by the white moderate. 

d. The church's role in the civil rights movement continues to create tension and alienate followers. 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 13, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Text

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A student is able to provide a detailed analysis of how a key individual or idea is introduced in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • · A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is illustrated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes) · A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes) · Illustrate means to explain, describe, or give example of an individual, event, or idea.
  • · Elaborate means to provide more details about an individual, event, or idea or to further develop an individual, event, or idea.
  • · An example is something that is mentioned in a text to help explain, illustrate or clarify a concept for readers.
  • · An anecdote is a short narrative that is often presented in an informational text to assist readers in comprehending the text.
  • · A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas based on specific information in the text. · A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  • · A student is able to explain procedures in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.  A student can describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.
  • · A student can use language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. 
  • Review Greek/Latin roots/suffixes
  • Students will continue to read and analyze in class "Letter from Birmingham Jail" pg. 12 and 13

 

  • Closure - exit ticket - What do you think the most impactful part of Dr. Martin Luther King's letter was and why?




Homework

none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What inference can you make about Dorothy in meeting the scarecrow?

a. She is brave. 

b. She is stubborn. 

c. She is lonely. 

d. She is intelligent. 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 14, 2017 Subject: Language Topic: Informational Text

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Students use context clues to determine what a word means in a given context (e.g., figurative, connotative).
  • · Determine the connotative meaning of particular words and phrases based on context
  • · Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.
  • · An exaggeration describes something as being greater, larger, more important, etc., than it really is - an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.
  • · A metaphor compares two unlike things to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things. Metaphors directly state that one thing is something else and do not use the words like or as.
  • · A simile compares two unlike things using like or as to illuminate a particular quality or aspect of one of the two things.
  • · Figurative meanings refer to words and phrases meant to be interpreted beyond the literal meaning of the word or words.
  • · Literal language means exactly what the word or word say; whereas, nonliteral or figurative language does not mean exactly what the word or words say, but instead uses comparison or emphasis to imply something different. 

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete a grade 7 Common Core CHOMP bellringer/Grade 7 Daily Language Spiral Review. These two review sheets cover a wide range of the 7th grade ELA standards for the year in the areas of reading, language, and writing. 
  • Students will review with Greek/Latin roots/affixes with a game of concentration in groups. 
  • In those same groups, students will draw a venn diagram comparing and contrasting "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and "Frankenstein: A Creature's Request". Each group will share their answers. 

 

  • Closure - all students will complete the venn diagram to use for a writing assignment to be turned in for a grade




Homework


Complete any unanswered questions from "Letter from Birmingham Jail" 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What is the meaning of the phrase "set it aside" as it is used in the sentence?

a. discard it

b. contain it with fencing

c. prevent it from being enjoyed

d. reserve it for a special purpose

Teacher: Abbott/Daniel Date: September 15, 2017 Subject: Language

Topic: Informational Text

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge - 
  • · Trace means to outline, delineate, or describe.
  • · A student should know the difference between a claim that is supported with reasons and evidence opposed to a claim this is unsupported.
  • · A student should know how to identify a speaker’s claim(s) and explain how each claim is supported by the argument or arguments the speaker makes (the evidence).
  • · A student should understand that a speaker uses reasons, facts, statistics, details, etc. to support his or her arguments for a claim or claims. A claim is a statement of opinion the writer or speaker is trying to prove.
  • · Argument(s) is how the speaker supports his claim(s); argument is the main point or points a speaker makes to provide supporting reasons and evidence for his claim. 

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Complete Greek/Latin quiz
  • Writing assignment on "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and "Frankenstein: A Creature's Request"
  • Review 4 1/2 week assessment

 

  • Closure - none




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 What is the author's point of view about the impact of movies? What information does the author use to support this point of view? Use detail from the text to support your answer. 

 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 5, 2017 Subject: Language ArtsTopic:Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)







RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)









I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)









  • Prior knowledge - 
  • Being able to determine a central idea of a text reflects comprehension of a text.
  •  A summary should contain only information from the text.
  •  Personal opinions about a topic or idea should not be included in a summary.
  •  Personal judgments about a topic or idea should not be included in a summary.
  •  A student is able to summarize a text.
  •  A student can identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text. A student can identify the focus of specific paragraphs within a text.

  • Activities/Centers -
  • Chomp 101/Daily Language Review Bellringer - Students complete a comprehensive review that addresses multiple standards and skills needed for success in 7th grade ELA. 
  • Students will receive answers to questions from Frankenstein: A Creature's Request in preparation for Friday's test on Frankenstein. 
  • Students will begin close reading "Letter from Birmingham Jail". Read pg. 1-3 stopping to discuss vocabulary, social themes, and central ideas of the text. 
  • Group work - students will get in collaborative groups to answer questions 1 and 2. 

  • Closure - Exit ticket - What is the central idea of the first page?




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard






Which statement best supports the answer to Part A?

a. "I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not  be concerned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere."

b. "Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action compaign that was "well timed" in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation." 

c. "I had hoped that the white moderate would understand the present tension in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation." 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 6, 2017Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)







 

 

Standard(s)







RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)









I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)









  • 4 1/2 week benchmark test



Homework

Write sentences for Greek and Latin root words multi/poly and not/nasc. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard






 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 7, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)







 

 

Standard(s)







RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)









I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)









  • 4 1/2 week benchmark assessment




Homework

none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard






 

Teacher: Abbott/Dillon Date: September 8, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)







 

 

Standard(s)







RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text (e.g., how ideas influence individuals or events, or how individuals influence ideas or events).

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims. 

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)









I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence. 

I CAN determine the central idea of a text and analyze it development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text. 

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. 

I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text. 

Procedures (with general times)









  • Prior knowledge - 
  •  Students focus closely and critically on content in an informational text.
  •  Students form a thorough understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  •  Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text is about.
  •  Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  •  Students understand what it means to draw inferences from a text. 
  • Students ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text.
  •  Students utilize an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as the MLA or the APA

 

  • Activities/Centers - 
  • Chomp 101/Daily Language Review Bellringer - Students complete a comprehensive review that addresses multiple standards and skills needed for success in 7th grade ELA. 
  • Students will complete comprehension test on "Frankenstein: A Creature's Request"
  • Students will receive a copy of their vocabulary for "Letter from Birmingham Jail"
  • Students will continue close read of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" reading pg. 4 and 5. 

 

  • Closure - Exit ticket - In "Letter from Birmingham Jail" Martin Luther King, Jr. states that "freedom is never voluntarily given". Think of the books you've read in the past and give an example of that statement. 

 




Homework



Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard






Which statement best expresses King's central argument in the text?

a. It is more importan to have  timely response to criticism and prejudice than to maintain moral integrity. 

b. The presence of injustice necessitates a nonviolent response in order to repair the harms of prejudice and discrimination. 

c. Peace in the South will only be achieved after white supremacitst are transformed by the white moderate. 

d. The church's role in the civil rights movement continues to create tension and alienate followers. 

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Dillon Date: August 21, 2017 Subject: Language Arts  Topic: Reading for Literature/Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shapes and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based on this analysis. 

RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). 

SL.7.1 (a-d) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support the analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea and analyze the development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior Knowledge - Students will complete a daily bellringer and language spiral review that addresses a wide range of standards students are already familiar with. Answers will be reviewed in class each day. (15-20 min)

 

  • Activities/Centers - Remediation and retest of Greek/Latin roots mem- and migr-. (30 min)
  • Library time for students to begin checking out books. (15 min)

 

  • Closure (none)




Homework


    none 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

How does the younger David try to get the older David to prove he is from the future?

 

Select right answer

He requests the outcomes of baseball games.

He inquires into the health of his parents.

He demands to see the design of the time machine.

He asks the older David to guess what he is thinking.

Teacher: Abbott Date: August 22, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature  and Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shapes and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based on this analysis. 

RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). 

SL.7.1 (a-d) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support the analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea and analyze the development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues. 

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior Knowledge - Students will complete a daily bellringer and language spiral review that addresses a wide range of standards students are already familiar with. Answers will be reviewed in class each day. (15-20 min)
  • Activities/Centers - Interactive greek and latin page on mob, mot, mov - "to move". (10 min) Students will cold read an excerpt from Frankenstein titled "A Creature's Request", looking for the theme or central idea of the text while reading. (15 min) Students will get into pairs and choose a argumentative stick with a topic on it. One student will take the pro position and the other will take the con position and they will debate the subject amongst them. (10 min)
  • Closure - Exit ticket - What do you think the theme or central idea of "A Creature's Request" is?




Homework


Answer questions 1-10 on Frankenstein

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





PART A: What is the meaning of “recompense” as it is used in paragraph 8 of the passage? A. make amends to B. pay tribute to C. bring shame on D. show understanding of

Teacher: Abbott Date: August 23, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature and Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shapes and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based on this analysis. 

RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). 

SL.7.1 (a-d) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support the analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea and analyze the development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues. 

Procedures (with general times)







  • Prior Knowledge - Students will complete a daily bellringer and language spiral review that addresses a wide range of standards students are already familiar with. Answers will be reviewed in class each day. (15-20 min)

 

  • Activities/Centers - Greek and Latin interactive notebook page for mon "to warn". (10-15 min) Review questions to Frankenstein (10 min). Students will receive academic vocabulary for Frankenstein (4 words). (5 min) Students will begin cold reading "Letter from Birmingham Jail". Read paragraphs 1-12). Students will make note of any connections between it and Frankenstein, particularly regarding the feelings of the characters/people. (15 min)

 

  • Exit ticket - What, if any similarities or connections do "Frankenstein: A Creature's Request" and "Letter from Birmingham Jail"




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What mood is established by the author's description of the setting in paragraph 2?

 

Select right answer

Clinical and unemotional

Exciting and adventurous

Mysterious and frightening

Celebratory and joyful

Teacher: Abbott Date: August 24, 2017 Subject: Language Arts  Topic: Reading for Literature and Speaking and Listening

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shapes and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based on this analysis. 

RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). 

SL.7.1 (a-d) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support the analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea and analyze the development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues. 

Procedures (with general times)







  • Prior Knowledge - Students will complete a daily bellringer and language spiral review that addresses a wide range of standards students are already familiar with. Answers will be reviewed in class each day. (15-20 min)

 

  • Activities/Centers - interactive notebook page for Greek and Latin root mort- meaning "death". (10 min) Students will read the next 12 paragraphs of "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and we will begin a class dicussion and close read of all material read thus far. Students will get into small groups/pairs and summarize the first 24 paragraphs. (30 min) Students will receive academic vocabulary for "Letter from Birmingham Jail". 

 

  •   Exit ticket - What has been the most surprising thing you've learned so far from reading "Letter from Birmingham Jail".

Homework


Answer questions 1-5 for "Letter from Birmingham Jail", reading any required reading necessary to answer those 5 questions. Complete cursive writing sheet. 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





1. What statement best describes King’s purpose in writing the letter?

A. King hoped to explain why the discrimination of African Americans is immoral by giving specific examples of its harmful effects.

B. King sought to criticize white Americans who were supportive of his cause but who were too fearful of the Klan’s terrorism to take action to end racism.

C. King attempts to encourage all Americans to end racism by joining the cause to defend civil rights for African Americans.

D. King sought to respond to the criticism he received from people that he considered to be colleagues by methodically addressing each of their claims

Teacher: Abbott Date: August 25, 2017 Subject: Language Arts Topic: Reading for Literature and Speaking and Listening 

 

Standard(s)






RL.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

RL.7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shapes and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based on this analysis. 

RL.7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot). 

SL.7.1 (a-d) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support the analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

I CAN determine a theme or central idea and analyze the development over the course of the text. 

I CAN analyze how particular elements of a literary text interact. 

I CAN engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions with diverse partners on grade 7 topics, texts, and issues. 

Procedures (with general times)







  • Prior Knowledge - Students will complete a daily bellringer and language spiral review that addresses a wide range of standards students are already familiar with. Answers will be reviewed in class each day. (15-20 min)

 

  • Activities/Centers - Take quiz on Greek and Latin roots (miss, mit, mob, mov, mon, mort). (15 min) Turn in all chomps and daily language review for a grade. (5 min) Continue close reading of "Letter from Birmingham Jail". (30 min) 

 

  • Exit slip: How does King’s rhetoric in paragraph 15 advance his purpose in the letter? Provide an explanation of how this paragraph contributes to the development of ideas in the text as a whole.




Homework


none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Why does David take notes about the movie?

 

Select right answer

He wants to see how it comes out.

He thinks it will tell him about his future.

He knows he will forget if he doesn’t take notes.

He wants to start learning how time travel works.

 

Teacher:  Dillon      Date: August 14, 2017         Subject: Language Arts              Topic: Writing and Language

 

Standard(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W.7.1. (a-e) Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.

W.7.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.7.6 Acquire and use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I CAN write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and evidence.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, or rewriting.

I CAN use standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

I CAN use standard English punctuation, capitalization, and spelling when writing.

I CAN determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words and phrases.

I CAN acquire and use grade-appropriate grade appropriate words and phrases.

 

Procedures (with general times)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·         CHOMP bellringer will address a variety of skills – including reading for information, reading for literature, writing, and language skills. (5-10 min)

·         Introduce first Greek and Latin root for the week: mit, miss “send” (Latin) – students will complete an interactive notebook page in their binders (10-15 min)

·         Students will cold read nonfiction passage “About Homelessness” and “Maggie and the Mission” from ReadWorks, identifying words they aren’t familiar with as they read. 4 of those words will be chosen as the vocabulary words for the week. (15 min)

·         Quick write prompt: Pretend you are in Maggie’s class and had to choose a community service project. What would your project be and why?

 

 

 

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writing Task 1

 

Here are some reminders for when you are completing this Writing Task:

  • Using the situation given below as a guide, write a story in your own words.
  • You may take notes, create a web, or do other prewriting work. Then, write your story on a sheet of paper.
  • After you complete writing your composition, read whatever you have written. Make sure that your writing is the best it can be.
  • After writing your answer click on the appropriate radio button.

 

Writing Situation:
Imagine yourself winning a game show and the prize is visiting a foreign country. Which country would you like to visit?


Writing Task:
Identify a foreign country you would like to visit. In a well developed composition, describe the country and write a rationale for your choice. Support your writing with examples and details.

 

Teacher:  Dillon     Date: August 15, 2017         Subject: Language Arts              Topic: Writing and Language

 

Standard(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W.7.1. (a-e) Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.

W.7.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.7.6 Acquire and use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I CAN write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and evidence.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, or rewriting.

I CAN use standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

I CAN use standard English punctuation, capitalization, and spelling when writing.

I CAN determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words and phrases.

I CAN acquire and use grade-appropriate grade appropriate words and phrases.

 

Procedures (with general times)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·         CHOMP bellringer will address a variety of skills – including reading for information, reading for literature, writing, and language skills. (5-10 min)

·         Introduce first Greek and Latin root for the week: mob, mot, mov –“move” (Latin) – students will complete an interactive notebook page in their binders (10-15 min)

·         As a whole class, students will close read “About Homelessness” paying close attention to text features, central idea, and key words and phrases. Students will underline one main idea from each paragraph and use to develop the central idea of the whole text. (15-20 min)

·         Quick write prompt: What do you believe the real reason for homelessness is and can it be prevented? Answer using prior knowledge, your opinion, and cite information from the text.

 

 

 

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which of the following lines from the passage includes a run-on sentence?

 

Select right answer

I can’t remember that far back, and we never liked baseball that much. But more importantly, I can’t tell you anything about the future.

“Yes, a time machine. I’m you, David, I’ve just come back in time.”

“Who was?”

“I’ll try,” I said.

 

Teacher:  Dillon      Date: August 16, 2017         Subject: Language Arts              Topic: Writing and Language

 

Standard(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W.7.1. (a-e) Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.

W.7.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.7.6 Acquire and use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I CAN write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and evidence.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, or rewriting.

I CAN use standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

I CAN use standard English punctuation, capitalization, and spelling when writing.

I CAN determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words and phrases.

I CAN acquire and use grade-appropriate grade appropriate words and phrases.

 

Procedures (with general times)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·         CHOMP bellringer will address a variety of skills – including reading for information, reading for literature, writing, and language skills. (5-10 min)

·         Review Greek and Latin roots (5 min)

·         As a whole class, students will close read “Maggie on a Mission” paying close attention to text features, central idea, and key words and phrases. Students will complete text analysis of characters, setting, and major plot points. (15-20 min)

·         Quick write prompt: extend the text. Imagine the story had continued. What would happen if Maggie’s class had chosen the homeless service project. What ways would they have been able to help? (15-20 min)

 

 

 

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read the following sentence from the article: “He wrote a thesis describing the best pedagogy to teach students chess.” What does “pedagogy” mean?

 

Select right answer

Competitive success

Thorough repetition

Philosophy of teaching

Gaming

 

Teacher:  Dillon      Date: August 17, 2017         Subject: Language Arts              Topic: Writing and Language

 

Standard(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W.7.1. (a-e) Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.

W.7.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.7.6 Acquire and use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I CAN write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and evidence.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, or rewriting.

I CAN use standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

I CAN use standard English punctuation, capitalization, and spelling when writing.

I CAN determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words and phrases.

I CAN acquire and use grade-appropriate grade appropriate words and phrases.

 

Procedures (with general times)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·         CHOMP bellringer will address a variety of skills – including reading for information, reading for literature, writing, and language skills. (5-10 min)

·         Review Greek and Latin roots (5 min)

·         Answer questions 1-4 on “About Homelessness” and “Maggie on a Mission” and review as a class.  (15-20 min)

·         Take Greek and Latin roots quiz (10 min)

·         Quick write prompt: What kind of homelessness best describes the man Maggie sees on the street? Support your answer with evidence from both texts.

 

 

 

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After reading the above story:

• Describe the specific successes of the Polgar sisters.

• Discuss the similarities and differences between the women in the article and men who play chess.

• Explain if the success of the Polgar sisters was due to their father’s teaching or to their own hard work.

 

Teacher:  Dillon     Date: August 18, 2017         Subject: Language Arts              Topic: Writing and Language

 

Standard(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

W.7.1. (a-e) Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.

W.7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to the task, purpose and audience.

W.7.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.

L.7.1 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

L.7.2 Demonstrate the command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L.7.3. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.

L.7.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words or phrases based on grade 7 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.

L.7.6 Acquire and use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I CAN write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and evidence.

I CAN produce clear and coherent writing.

I CAN develop and strengthen writing by planning, revising, editing, or rewriting.

I CAN use standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

I CAN use standard English punctuation, capitalization, and spelling when writing.

I CAN determine or clarify the meaning of unknown or multiple-meaning words and phrases.

I CAN acquire and use grade-appropriate grade appropriate words and phrases.

 

Procedures (with general times)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·         Complete reading and essay test on “The Sniper”, “Homelessness”, and “Maggie on a Mission”

 

 

 

 

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does it mean to say that success is “environmental,” not “biological?”

 

Select right answer

Success depends on which national culture you were born into.

Success is in your genes and you have to bring it out.

Chess is more a woman’s game than most people believe.

The way society treats people greatly influences the possibility of success.

 

May 15, 2017- May 19, 2017

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

w & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

Monday May  15, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

w & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 I can compare and contrast a written story to film and media version

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 I can successfully complete 4th 9 Weeks Test.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW read the remaining chapters of Divergent and begin their 4th 9 Weeks Test.

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW work on 9 Weeks Test until completion

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

novel

paper

pencil

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read Library  book to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

 

Tuesday May 16, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW complete 4th 9 Weeks Test

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW read and complete test

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

 Novel 

Worksheet

Pen

Pencil

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete  AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Wednesday May 17, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

TSW watch Divergent Movie

 

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 Novel

Pen

Pencil

paper

Worksheet

Divergent movie

 

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Thursday May 18, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

TSW watch Divergent movie

 

 

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Novel

Pen

Paper

Pencil

Worksheet

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

Friday May 19,2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 TSW Divergent Movie

 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Divergent movie

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement.

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 May 8, 2017-May 12, 2017

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

Monday May  8, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW read and answers questions from Chapters 27-30 of Divergent.

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW turn in question and answers once they have completed the questions.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

novel

paper

pencil

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read Library  book to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

 

Tuesday May 9, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW complete Chapters 30-33 on Divergent

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW read and complete worksheet.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

 Novel 

Worksheet

Pen

Pencil

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete  AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Wednesday May 10, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

TSW complete Chapters 15-18

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

TSW turn in complete questions on Chapters15-18

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 Novel

Pen

Pencil

paper

Worksheet

 

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Thursday May 11, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

TSW read and answer questions from Chapters 34-37

 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Novel

Pen

Paper

Pencil

Worksheet

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

Friday May 12,2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 TSW complete Chapter 38-39 questions on Divergent.

 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Novel

Paper

pencil

Worksheet

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement.

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

 

 

May 1, 2017-May 5, 2017

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

Monday May  1, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW read and answers questions from Chapters 13- 15 of Divergent.

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW turn in question and answers once they have completed the questions.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

novel

paper

pencil

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read Library  book to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

 

Tuesday May 2, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW complete Chapters 13-15 on Divergent

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW read and complete worksheet.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

 Novel 

Worksheet

Pen

Pencil

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete  AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Wednesday May 3, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

TSW complete Chapters 15-18

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

TSW turn in complete questions on Chapters15-18

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 Novel

Pen

Pencil

paper

Worksheet

 

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Thursday May 4, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

TSW read and answer questions from Chapters 19-22

 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Novel

Pen

Paper

Pencil

Worksheet

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

Friday May 5,2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 TSW complete Chapter 23-26 questions on Divergent.

 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Novel

Paper

pencil

Worksheet

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement.

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 24- 28, 2017

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

Monday April 24, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW read and answers questions from Chapters 8-10 of Divergent.

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW turn in question and answers once they have completed the questions.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

 

 

 

Homework:

 

 

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

 

 

Tuesday April 25, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

 TSW complete Chapters 11-13 on Divergent

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

 TSW read and complete worksheet.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

 Novel 

Worksheet

Pen

Pencil

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete  AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Wednesday April 26, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 

TSW complete Chapters 14-16 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

TSW turn in complete questions on Chapters 14-16

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 Novel

Pen

Pencil

paper

Worksheet

 

 

 

Homework:

 

 TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Thursday April 27, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

TSW read and answer questions from Chapters 17-20.

 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Novel

Pen

Paper

Pencil

Worksheet

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

Friday

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and Contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 6-8 text complexity band proficiency.

RI 7.2 Determine two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast a written story

 I can read and comprehend literature.

 I can determine two or more central ideas in a text.

 

 

 

Independent Practice:

 TSW complete Chapter 11-13 questions on Divergent.

 

 

 

 

Formative Assessment:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Novel

Paper

pencil

Worksheet

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read to complete AR requirement.

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

TTW assist students as needed.

April 10, 2017- April 14, 2017 

 

RI Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL. 7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and its shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon analysis.

W. 7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which  the development, or organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.            

 

 

Monday- April 10, 2017 Students will take NWEA MAP test

Tuesday-  April 11, 2017 Students will take NWEA MAP Test

Wednesday- April 12, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RI Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL. 7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and its shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon analysis.

W. 7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which  the development, or organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.            

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 I can cite textual evidence in an informative text.

 I can determine the central idea of a text

 I can write clear and concise using the RACES strategy.

 

 

 

Bell Ringer

 How would you handle being faction-less if you didn't make Dauntless? How would you survive? Would you revolt against the other factions?

Guided Practice:

 

TTW introduce the RACES strategy to students using PowerPoint. TTW introduce informative text  on Divergent while the students are using the RACES Strategy.  TTW implement the pair work strategy so that students may work together on the  RACES strategy. TTW allow students to share with the class their findings with the class.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. action

    a clique that seeks power usually through intrigue

    “I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but we are in the same faction now.”

  2. writhe

    to move in a twisting or contorted motion

    I walk to the center of the arena and my guts writhe as Peter comes toward me, taller than I remembered, arm muscles standing at attention.

  3. sluggish

    moving slowly

    He shoves me and I fall again, scraping my hands on the ground, blinking, sluggish and slow and hot.

  4. fragile

    easily broken or damaged or destroyed

    I could not be attracted to Al—I could not be attracted to anyone that fragile.

  5. diffuse

    move outward

    I smile as much as my bruised cheek will allow, hoping that will diffuse the tension.

Independent Practice:

TSW take notes while listening to the introduction of the strategy. TSW work in groups to complete assignment using the RACES strategy.TSW share with the class their answers using the RACE Strategy.

 

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

 theme

 cite

 evidence

 RACES

Formative Assessment:

 

TSW use their work on the RACE strategy as their exit ticket.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Promethean Board

Paper

Pen

Pencils

Divergent Novel

 

 

 

Homework:

TSW read AR book to complete requirement for 4th 9 Weeks

 

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

 

Thursday April 13, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RI Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL. 7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and its shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon analysis.

W. 7.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which  the development, or organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.            

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

I can cite textual evidence in an informative text.

 I can determine the central idea of a text

 I can write clear and concise using the RACES strategy.

 

 

 

 

Bell Ringer:

 What are some common themes in the novel? Explain how they are themes of the novel.

Guided Practice:

 

 TTW introduce informative text and review students on citing textual evidence. TTW introduce a text and guide students to determining evidence for a specific text. TTW also guide  students through the reading of the text.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. mesmerize

    induce hypnosis in

    For a second the colors mesmerize me, bright green and deep blue and brown.

  2. abnegation

    renunciation of one's own interests in favor of others

    It’s one of the many things Erudite gives as evidence of Abnegation’s incompetence.

  3. dilapidated

    in deplorable condition

    The dilapidated buildings are gone, replaced by yellow fields and train tracks.

  4. taunt

    harass with persistent criticism or carping

    If Peter tries to taunt me, she will defend me.

  5. smirk

    a smile expressing smugness or scorn instead of pleasure

    “Got something to prove?” asks Eric, with his trademark smirk.

  6. forlorn

    marked by or showing hopelessness

    Al gives me a forlorn look, and I smile back in what I hope is a reassuring way.

 Independent Practice

 TSW read informative text and find textual evidence. TSW also continue reading the remaining chapters of Divergent.

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

theme

 cite

 evidence

 RACES

Formative Assessment:

TSW complete an exit ticket.

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Promethean Board

Paper

Pen

Pencils

Divergent Novel

 

 

 

 

Homework:

TSW read library book to complete AR requirement for 4th 9 Weeks.

 

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Friday-  April 14, 2017 Good Friday

 

 

 

Monday 4-3-17

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

W.7.2 - Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships

among ideas and concepts.

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result

of this lesson?)

* I can use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships

among ideas and concepts. (bellringer and review of it)

*I can analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

(reading and discussion of current portion of Divergent novel)

 

Bell Ringer:

Faction symbol sheet

 

Guided Practice:

TTW introduce the faction symbol sheet and class review of it, Divergent, 

and class review.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

scrutinizing, dilapidated, 

conspicuously, indifferently

Independent Practice:

TSW complete bellringer, participate in class review, and participate in class 

reading and revew of today's portion of the novel.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

infer, deduct, imply, cite

Formative Assessment:

bellringer sheet

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used

in this lesson?)

Common Core Divergent materials

Promethean board

student journals

 

Homework for the week: 

Homework is the same all week. Each student must read  AR (library) books 

to obtain a certain number of AR points. Some reading time is allowed at school,

but the majority of reading is to be completed at home after school.

Also, if there is any classwork that is not completed in class, then the student

is responsible for completing that work at home after school.

 

Modifications/Accommodations for the week:

Each day, both the general and Special Education teacher will assist

all students as needed.

 

Tuesday 4-4-17

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

W.7.2 - Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships

among ideas and concepts.

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

SL.7.1 - Engage effectively with diverse partners on grade 7 topics.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result

of this lesson?)

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

(bellringer)

SL.7.1 - Engage effectively with diverse partners on grade 7 topics. (crossword

puzzle with partner)

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

(novel)

 

Bell Ringer:

After the choosing ceremony,

how does the way Caleb

acts affect Beatrice?

Cite evidence 

from the novel to explain.

Guided Practice:

TTW display bellringer on Promethean board and discuss it with class,

introduce crossword puzzle activity (to be done with a partner), and today's

portion of the novel Divergent.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

scrutinizing, dilapidated, 

conspicuously, indifferently

Independent Practice:

TSW complete bellringer, review it with class, work with a partner to

complete the crossword puzzle, and participate in reading today's portion

of the class novel, Divergent.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

infer, deduct, imply, cite

Formative Assessment:

bellringer and classroom novel

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used

in this lesson?)

Promethean board, Divergent materials, academic vocabulary sheet, student journal

 

 

Wednesday 4-5-17

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

W.7.2 - Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships

among ideas and concepts.

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

SL.7.1 - Engage effectively with diverse partners on grade 7 topics.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result

of this lesson?)

SL.7.1 - Engage effectively with diverse partners on grade 7 topics. (whole group discussion and review of Daily Edit.

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

(read today's portion of Divergent)

 

 

Daily Edit: 

Shailene Woodley who played

Beatrice in divergent was born

in 1991 her mother was a middle

school councilor and her father

was a principal and she had to where

braces from her chest to her hips

because she had scoliosis and she started

acting in 2001 on tv and has one many

awards for her acting

Guided Practice:

TTW display Daily Edit on Promethean board, have a student run the board

and conduct review of Daily Edit, facilitate discussion, (while reviewing Theme),

and introduce today's portion of the novel.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

scrutinizing, dilapidated, 

conspicuously, indifferently

Independent Practice:

TSW complete Daily Edit, participate to run the board and conduct review of the

answers, participate in class discussion, and participate in reading today's portion 

of the class novel.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

infer, deduct, imply, cite

 

Formative Assessment:

Daily Edit and class discussion

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used

in this lesson?)

Promethean board, Shailene Woodley biography, student journal, vocabulary sheet

 

Thursday 4-6-17

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

W.7.2 - Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships

among ideas and concepts.

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

SL.7.1 - Engage effectively with diverse partners on grade 7 topics.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result

of this lesson?)

W.7.2 - Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify the relationships

among ideas and concepts. (bellringer)

RI.7.3 - Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

(bellringer)

SL.7.1 - Engage effectively with diverse partners on grade 7 topics. (whole group)

 

Bell Ringer:

In Chapter 12, how does Al's crying

affect Tris? Why do you think it affects

her in this way? Cite evidence from the

book to explain.

Guided Practice:

TTW introduce bellringer, review, discussion, and today's portion of book.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

scrutinizing, dilapidated, 

conspicuously, indifferently

Independent Practice:

TSW complete bellringer, participate in review and discussion, and participate

in reading today's portion of the book.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

infer, deduct, imply, cite

 

Formative Assessment:

bellringer and class discussion

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used

in this lesson?)

 

 

 

 

 

Friday 4-7-17 TEST DAY

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed: All standards covered this week

 

 

 

 

 

March 27, 2017-March 31, 2017

RL. 7.2 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI 7.6 Determine a theme or central theme of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.

W. 7.2 Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify among ideas and concepts.

 

Monday March 27, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL. 7.2 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI 7.6 Determine a theme or central theme of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.

W. 7.2 Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify among ideas and concepts.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

I can determine common themes throughout the novel.

I can determine point of view from informational text.

I can use transitional words to make my writing more fluid.

 

 

 

Bell Ringer:

There are only five factions; are there any other human virtues missing from the list? Why would these be necessary in well-rounded citizens?

Guided Practice:

 

 

TTW review all chapters covered in the novel. TTW guide students through the text questions as well as the continual reading of the novel.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. aptitude

    inherent ability

    Today is the day of the aptitude test that will show me which of the five factions I belong in.

  2. jostle

    come into rough contact with while moving

    Every time it hits a patch of uneven pavement, it jostles me from side to side, even though I’m gripping the seat to keep myself still.

  3. antagonistic

    arousing animosity or hostility

    This sort of thing has been happening to others in my faction for months now—the Erudite have been releasing antagonistic reports about Abnegation, and it has begun to affect the way we relate at school.

  4. demeanor

    the way a person behaves toward other people

    The gray clothes, the plain hairstyle, and the unassuming demeanor of my faction are supposed to make it easier for me to forget myself, and easier for everyone else to forget me too.

  5. exodus

    a journey by a group to escape from a hostile environment

    And as the last few cars pass, a mass exodus of young men and women in dark clothing hurl themselves from the moving cars, some dropping and rolling, others stumbling a few steps before regaining their balance.

Independent Practice:

TSW review previously covered chapters of Divergent. TSW also answers questions from chapters already already covered as well as continue to read the subsequent chapters.

 

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

 theme

transition

Formative Assessment:

 

TSW complete exit ticket

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Promethean Board

Paper

Pencil

Pens

Worksheets

 

 

 

Homework:

TSW read AR book to fulfill 4th 9 Weeks Reading Requirement

 

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

Tuesday March 28, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL. 7.2 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI 7.6 Determine a theme or central theme of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.

W. 7.2 Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify among ideas and concepts.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can determine common themes throughout the novel.

 

I can determine point of view from informational text.

 

I can use transitional words to make my writing more fluid.

 

 

Bell Ringer:

Discuss Tris Prior as our protagonist. Is she a reliable narrator? Does she always tell the truth? Are we constrained by her point of view?

Guided Practice:

 TTW continue to guide through the reading of Divergent and the answering of the next set of questions.

 

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. simulation

    the act of imitating the behavior of some situation

    “Typically, each stage of the simulation eliminates one or more of the factions, but in your case, only two have been ruled out.”

  2. scenario

    a postulated sequence of possible events

    If you had shown an automatic distaste for the knife and selected the cheese, the simulation would have led you to a different scenario that confirmed your aptitude for Amity.

  3. alignment

    an organization of people involved in a pact or treaty

    Your intelligent response to the dog indicates strong alignment with the Erudite.

Independent Practice:

 

TSW continue reading Divergent and answering critical thinking questions

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

theme

point of view

transition

Formative Assessment:

 

TSW complete exit strategy.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Promethean Board

Pen

Paper

Worksheets

Novel

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read AR book for  4th 9 Weeks reading requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

Wednesday March 29, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL. 7.2 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI 7.6 Determine a theme or central theme of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

I can determine common themes throughout the novel.

 

I can determine point of view from informational text.

 

I can use transitional words to make my writing more fluid.

 

Bell Ringer:

Which theme in the novel would you consider the most significant, and why?

Guided Practice:

 

TTW guide students into discovering which faction they belong to. Once the students determine their factions .TTW have students change groups and write common themes about being their respective factions. 

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. divergent

    tending to move apart in different directions

    My conclusion,” she explains, “is that you display equal aptitude for Abnegation, Dauntless, and Erudite. People who get this kind of result are . . .” She looks over her shoulder like she expects someone to appear behind her. “. . . are called . . . Divergent.”

  2. forsake

    leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch

    But choosing a different faction means I forsake my family.

  3. initiation

    a formal entry into an organization or position or office

    Because they failed to complete initiation into whatever faction they chose, they live in poverty, doing the work no one else wants to do.

  4. acrid

    strong and sharp, as a taste

    I smell something acrid and unpleasant on his breath.

  5. disdain

    lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike

    The reason for the simplicity isn’t disdain for uniqueness, as the other factions have sometimes interpreted it.

Independent Practice:

TSW discover their respective factions and persuade their peers why they would be the best faction to run the world.

 

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

transition

point of view

theme

Formative Assessment:

 

TSW use point of view to persuade their peers of why their respective faction is best to run the world.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Promethean Board

Pencils

Paper

Worksheets

Novel

 

 

Homework:

 

 

TSW read AR book in fulfillment of their 4th 9 Weeks reading requirement.

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Thursday March 30, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL. 7.2 Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI 7.6 Determine a theme or central theme of a text and analyze its development over the course of a text.

RL 7.10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems.

W. 7.2 Use appropriate transitions to create cohesion and clarify among ideas and concepts.

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can determine common themes throughout the novel.

 

I can determine point of view from informational text.

 

I can use transitional words to make my writing more fluid.

 

 

Bell Ringer:

Compare and contrast Peter and Jeanine Matthews as antagonists. Who would be considered the central antagonist?

Guided Practice:

 

TTW guide students through a review of the standards covered this week through direct questioning and online games. TTW also continue to guide students through the reading of the novel.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

duplicity

acting in bad faith

I seem to have persuaded Susan and Robert, who no longer look concerned for my mental stability, but Caleb narrows his eyes at me, the way he does when he suspects someone of duplicity.

tentative

hesitant or lacking confidence; unsettled in mind or opinion

He and I have been exchanging looks for the past year as Susan and Caleb flirt in the tentative way known only to the Abnegation.

 impeccable

without fault or error

Our leaders are selected by their peers for their impeccable character, moral fortitude, and leadership skills.

 devastate

cause extensive destruction or ruin utterly

Two years ago, Marcus’s son, Tobias, left us for the Dauntless, and Marcus was devastated.

falter

be or become weak, steady, or uncertain

Tori’s warning whispers in my memory every time my resolve to keep my mouth shut falters.

engulf

flow over or cover completely

We set an example for our fellow faction members, and soon the three of us are engulfed in the mass of gray fabric ascending cement stairs in the half light.

Independent Practice:

 

TSW review for test and participate in online games. TSW also continue reading the novel.

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

transition

point of view

Formative Assessment:

 

TSW complete exit ticket

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Promethean Board

Pen

Paper

Worksheets

Novel

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read AR book in fulfillment 4th 9 Weeks requirement

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TSW assist students as needed.

 

 

Friday, March 31, 2017 Common Assessment



L. 7.1b-Choose among simple, compound, complex, and

compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships

among ideas.

RL.7.2 - I can determine a central idea of a text and provide a summary.

RL.7.3 - Analyze how elements of a story interact. (class discussion on

novel, Divergent)

RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words as they are used in a text.

W.7.4 - Produce a clear and coherent writing...appropriate to audience.

(exit ticket)

Monday 3-20-17

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words as they are used in a text.

W.7.4 - Produce a clear and coherent writing...appropriate to audience.

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able

to do as a result of this lesson?)
RL.7.4 - I can determine the meaning of words as they're used in a text.

(taking notes on Utopia and Dystopia)

W.7.4 - I can produce a clear and coherent writing appropriate to purpose.

(A. turn & talk- Do you think our society has more characteristics

of a Utopian or Dystopian society?

B. - Writing Prompt: Write your answer using the RACE strategy.)

Writing Prompt:

Do you think our society has 

more characteristics of a Utopian

or Dystopian society? Explain why.

Give specific details and use

descriptive language.

 

Guided Practice:

TTW introduce notes on Utopian and Dystopian societies.

TTW review RACE strategy and introduce "turn & talk" and writing

assignment.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

Dytopia

Utopia

Independent Practice:

TSW take notes on Dystopian and Utopian societies.

TSW "turn and talk" with another student for a set amount of time.

TSW complete writing prompt.

Academic Vocabulary:

strategy

Formative Assessment:

writing assignment

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Promethean board, student journals, pencils and paper, PowerPoint

Homework for the week: 

Each nine weeks, students are given a project grade for reading Accelerated Reader books (library books). 

When time permits, teachers will allow students to read quietly, but this time is not nearly enough for 

students to obtain the total of points required. Please read AR as homework.

Also, any classwork not completed in class must be completed for homework.

Modifications/Accommodations:

The teachers will assist all students as needed and follow any guidelines set forth in IEP.

 

Tuesday 3-21-17

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL.7.3 - Analyze how elements of a story interact. (class discussion on

novel, Divergent)

W.7.4 - Produce a clear and coherent writing...appropriate to audience.

(exit ticket)

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able

to do as a result of this lesson?)

I can produce a clear and coherent writing... appropriate to audience.

(bellringer)

I can analyze how elements of a story interact. (exit ticket)

Daily Edit:

What point of view is the novel

Divergent written from? How

does using that point of view

affect the mood of the novel

so far?

Guided Practice:

TTW introduce bellringer, today's portion of the novel, and exit 

ticket.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

faction

indulgent

aptitude

Independent Practice:

TSW complete bellringer, participate in reading today's portion

of the novel Divergent, and complete exit ticket.

Academic Vocabulary:

infer

Formative Assessment:

exit ticket

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

promethean, Divergent materials, Divergent book, student journal

 

 

Wednesday 3-22-17

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words as they're used in a text.

RL.7.2 - Determine a central idea of a text and provide a summary.

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as

a result of this lesson?)

RL.7.2 - I can determine a central idea of a text and provide a summary.

RL.7.4 - I can determine the meaning of words as they're used

in a text. (Divergent vocabulary sheet)

Bell Ringer:

Summarize yesterday's

portion of Divergent.

What is the central idea

of these pages?

Guided Practice:

TTW introduce bellringer, vocabulary sheet, and today's portion of Divergent.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

emerges

placid

Independent Practice:

TSW complete bellringer, vocabulary sheet, and participate in reading

today's portion of Divergent.

Academic Vocabulary:

describe

Formative Assessment:

bellringer

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

student journal, Divergent, promethean board, chalkboard, Divergent materials 

 

 

Thursday 3-23-17

Common Core Lea

 

rning Standard(s) Addressed:

L.7.1b -Choose among simple, compound, complex, and

compound-complex sentences to signal differing relationships

among ideas.

RL.7.2 - I can write an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

L.7.1b - I can choose among simple, compound, complex, and

compound-complex sentences to signal differing

relationships among ideas. (writing prompt)

RL.7.2 - I can provide an objective summary of the text. (writing

prompt)

RL.7.4 - I can determine the meaning of words as they're used

in a text. (class reading of Divergent)

Writing Prompt:

Using all three sentence

structures, write a summary

of what has happened in 

Divergent.

Guided Practice:

TTW display writing prompt on promethean board, along with review

of sentence structure.

TTW introduce today's portion of the story.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

connotation

Independent Practice:

TSW complete writing prompt and review with teacher.

TSW participate in class reading of Divergent.

Academic Vocabulary:

objective

Formative Assessment:

writing prompt

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

promethean board, Divergent novel and materials, student journal, pencils, paper

 

 

Friday 3-24-17 - TEST ON WEEK'S STANDARDS USING DIVERGENT COMMON CORE MATERIALS

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed: L.7.1b, RL.7.2, RL.7.3, RL.7.4, W.7.4

 

 

RL 7 .1  Cite Several pieces of textual evidence to support  analysis  of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the test.

RL 7.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective for the summary

RL 7.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact( e.g  how setting shapes the characters or plot)

RL 7.6  Compare how an author develops and contrasts the points of view of different  characters or narrators in a text.

RL 7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing  the effects of techniques.

RL 7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of  time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period.

RI 7.1 Cite Several pieces of textual evidence to support  analysis  of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the test.

RI 7.2 Determine  two or more central ideas in a text and analyze their development over the course of the text; Provide an objective summary

RI 7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text and analyze their development over the course of the text; including figurative language, connotative, and technical meanings

RI 7.5 Analyze a structure an author uses to organize a text including how all the major sections contribute to the whole development

RI 7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject.

L 7.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of the standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

L 7.2 A Use a comma to separate coordinate adjectives( e.g  It was a fascinating, enjoyable movie but he not wore an old green shirt)

L 7.3 Choose language that expresses ideas precisely and concisely, recognizing and eliminating wordiness and redundancy

L 7.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

 

Monday March 6, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 

All standards covered during the 9 Weeks will be

 tested

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

TSW be able to demonstrate the level of mastery of standards covered in 3rd 9 Weeks.

Bell Ringer: What do you plan on doing over Spring Break? Write two paragraphs?

Guided Practice:

TTW guide students through a myriad of games preparing them for tests that start on Tuesday.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

Review of Greek and Latin root words covered this 9 Weeks.

Independent Practice:

 

TSW play selected online games and discuss any problems with any of the objectives covered.

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Review of all academic root words covered this 9 Weeks.

Formative Assessment:

 

The online games will act as a formative assessment of standards covered.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

Promethean Board

Paper

Pencils

Pens

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW study for his/her 9 Weeks Test.

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

 

 

Tuesday May 7-10, 2017 is 3rd 9 Weeks Test

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
February 27- March 3, 2017
 
L. 7.5 Demonstrate understanding of the figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
 RL 7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as references drawn from the text.
RL 7.4 Determine the meaning of the words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings
RI 7.6 Determine the author's point of view in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from the text.

Monday 2-27-17 

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed this week:

L.7.5 - Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in work meanings. 

RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly, as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they're used in a text.

RI.7.6 - Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will

students know & be able to do as a result

of this lesson?)

L.7.5 - I can demonstrate understanding

of figurative language. (Holes final quiz)

RL.7.1 - I can cite several pieces of textual

evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly, as well as inferences drawn from the text.

(test practice)

Daily Edit: I only have 1 weak to get all

my Ar points and 9 weeks tests is next

week so I half to thank bout what eye can 

due to be prepared. if i don't have all my points,

I will read my AR book after school and when I

have free time during school. I will pay closed

attention this week to be ready. Next weak I will go to sleep early and I won't eat sugar or drink soft drinks till after school. i will be proud that eye did my best on my nine weeks test.

Guided Practice:

TTW introduce display Daily Edit on promethean board and allow student volunteer to run the board as class edits it. TTW introduce "A New Neighbor" (Common

Core practice) story.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

sympathetic, controversial

Independent Practice:

TSW complete Daily Edit, edit it with class, and complete practice story.

Academic Vocabulary:

inference

Formative Assessment:

"A New Neighbor"

Resources/Materials for the week: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?) - promethean board, Common Core Reading Practice workbook, student journal, internet resources

Homework for the week:Students are responsible for completing any work not finished in class. Each student is also responsible for reading library books (AR books) and obtaining a certain number of AR points. 

Modifications/Accommodations for the week:

All teachers will assist students as needed and in accordance with any IEP or 504 requirements and recommendations.

 

Tuesday 2-28-17

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

RI.7.6- I can determine an author's point of view or purpose and analyze it. (Thomas Edison paper)

RL.7.1 - I can cite several pieces of evidence to support what the author says.(Thomas Edison paper)

Writing Prompt: A little boy was born the youngest of seven children. He was hyperactive, and teachers complained. His mother had to take him out of school

and home school him. He became sick and developed hearing problems in both ears. He was nearly deaf when he grew up. What kind of life would you infer that he would have? What kind of job would he have? Would he get married? Provide details from the text.

Guided Practice:

TTW display writing prompt on promethean board, go over answers with class using RACE strategy, pass out Thomas Edison papers, and put students in pairs to complete.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

telegraph

Independent Practice:

TSW complete writing prompt and review with class, then complete Thomas Edison questions with class.

Academic Vocabulary:

analyze, determine

Formative Assessment: both Thomas Edison informational text and writing prompt 

 
 
 

 

Wednesday 3-1-17

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do

as a result of this lesson?)

RL.7.4 -I can determine the meanings of words and phrases as they are

used in a text. (bellringer) (classwork)

RI.7.6 - I can determine an author's purpose or point of view and analyze it.

(review of yesterday's passage)

Bell Ringer:

Common Core Reading

workbook passage, "Paint Pals"

Guided Practice:

TTW introduce the passage, "Paint Pals", allow students to complete it

individually, then review it as a class using the RACE strategy.

TTW review the Thomas Edison passage with the class.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

expectations

Independent Practice:

TSW read and complete the passage, "Paint Pals", review it with the class, 

review the RACE strategy, and review the Thomas Edison passage.

Academic Vocabulary:

analyze

Formative Assessment:

RACE strategy, Paint Pals, and Thomas Edison

 

 

Thursday 3-2-17

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

L.7.5 - I can demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in work meanings. 

RL.7.1 - I can cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly, as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.7.4 - I can determine the meaning of words and phrases as they're used in a text.

RI.7.6 - I can determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

Bell Ringer:

This week we used the RACE strategy. How did it affect your

comprehension of the question?

Do you feel like it helped you to

find the correct answer? Why or

why not? If not, what strategy helps

you find the correct answer?

Guided Practice:

TTW display writing prompt on promethean board and review it.

TTW introduce review games.

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

Review Jeopardy

Independent Practice:

TSW complete writing prompt and participate in review.

TSW participate in Review Jeopardy.

Academic Vocabulary:

specific

Formative Assessment:

Review Jeopardy

 

 

Friday 3-3-17

Today we will have a test on this week's standards:

L.7.5 - Demonstrate understanding of figurative language and word relationships.

RL.7.1 - Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the

              text says explicitly, as well as inferences drawn from the text.

RL.7.4 - Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in

              in a text, including figurative and connotative language.

RI.7.6 - Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and analyze

             how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

   

  February 20-24, 2017

RL 7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

 RL 7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

RI 7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

W 7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

 

 

Monday February  20, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

 Student Holiday

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)


 

 

Bell Ringer:

Guided Practice:

 

 

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

Independent Practice:

 

 

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Formative Assessment:

 

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

 

 

 

 

Homework:

 

 

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

 

 

 

Tuesday February 21, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL 7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

 RL 7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

RI 7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

W 7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 I can compare and contrast the written version of Holes to the Holes movie.

I can compare the novel Holes to the historical content of Jim Crow laws.

 I can compare and contrast the Holes text to the video version to determine the difference in delivery of words.

I can write a narrative similar with elements similar to the Holes novel.

 

 

Bell Ringer:

 As you begin the nearing the end of the school year, do you feel confident in your ability to score proficient on state test? Why or why not? In what areas do you feel you need the most help with?

 

Guided Practice:

 TTW guide students through the completion of the Holes novel and questions stemming from the text.

Mrs. Arnold will come to Miss Dillon's class to speak with her students about Magnolia Training (5 to 10 minute PowerPoint)

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. warden

    the chief official in charge of a prison

    He wondered why the Warden would ever have the need to wear nail polish or makeup.

    Juvenile correctional facilities like the one in "Holes" would have such a chief official.

  2. gash

    a wound made by cutting

    He felt his wet blood and a pretty big gash just below his ear.

  3. wound

    an injury to living tissue

    Mr. Sir made a bandage out of a piece of his sack of sunflower seeds and taped it over Stanley's wound.

  4. callus

    a skin area that is thick or hard from continual pressure

    His muscles had strengthened, and his hands were tough and callused.

  5. moisture

    wetness caused by water

    He barely had enough moisture in his mouth to seal and stamp the envelope.

Independent Practice:

 

TSW read the last few questions of Holes and answer the corresponding questions.

TSW begin writing their own narratives

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Greek and Latin Root Words

arthr- joint      

art -skill           

astro, aster -star, stars, outer space 

aud/i/io-hear        

Formative Assessment:

TSW complete questions on the Holes 

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Promethean Board

Pen

Pencils

paper

novel

guided questions

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read library book to complete AR requirement

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

 

Wednesday February 22, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

 RL 7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

RI 7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

W 7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

 I can compare and contrast the written version of Holes to the Holes movie.

 I can compare the novel Holes to the historical content of Jim Crow  laws.

 I can compare and contrast the Holes text to the video version to determine the difference in delivery of words.

 I can write a narrative similar with elements similar to the Holes novel.

 

Bell Ringer:

In an essay, explain how disappointments can have a good side. 

Guided Practice:

TTW guide students through the directions for Common assessment

 

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. exhaust

    gases ejected from an engine as waste products

    The air was thick with heat, dust, and exhaust fumes.

  2. fume

    a cloud of fine particles suspended in a gas

    The air was thick with heat, dust, and exhaust fumes.

  3. appreciate

    recognize with gratitude; be grateful for

    And as the truck bounced along the dirt, he was able to appreciate the air blowing through the open window onto his hot and sweaty face.

  4. condemn

    pronounce a punishment, as in a court of law

    Stanley wondered if this was how a condemned man felt on his way to the electric chair—appreciating all of the good things in life for the last time.

Independent Practice:

TSW complete Common Assessment for this week's objectives

 

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Greek and Latin Root words

capt, cept, ceive-  take, hold  

     cardi/o - heart   

Formative Assessment:

TSW complete test and turn it in

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Test packet

Promethean

Pencils

Pens

Paper

 

 

 

Homework:

 

 TTW read library book in order to complete AR requirement for 3rd 9 Weeks

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed

 

 

Thursday February 23, 2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

 

RL 7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

 RL 7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

 

I can compare and contrast the written version of Holes to the Holes movie.

I can compare the novel Holes to the historical content of Jim Crow laws.

 

 

Bell Ringer:

Write an essay explaining how you changed when you entered middle school. 

Guided Practice:

TTW begin class with how some elements of the Holes novel is similar to the struggle of African Americans during the Jim Crow era.

TTW also introduce the movie Holes to the students and have them complete a compare and contrast worksheet while watching the film.

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. toxic

    of or relating to or caused by a poison

    "It's only toxic while it's wet."

  2. recede

    become faint or more distant

    For a second, Mr. Sir's pain seemed to recede.

  3. shrill

    having or emitting a high-pitched and sharp tone or tones

    Then his head jerked violently, and he let out a shrill scream, worse than the one before.

Independent Practice:

TSW answer discussion questions on Holes and Jim Crow.

TSW begin watching the film version of Holes while simultaneously completing the worksheet.

 

 

 

Academic Vocabulary

Greek and Latin Root Words

cess -go, yield        

celer- fast

Formative Assessment:

 

TSW complete an exit ticket.

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Test packet

Promethean

Pencils

Pens

Paper

 

 

 

Homework:

 

TSW read an AR book for completion of reading requirement for 3rd 9 Weeks

 

 

Modifications/Accommodations:

 

TTW assist students as needed.

 

 

Friday February 24,2017

Common Core Learning Standard(s) Addressed:

RL 7.7 Compare and contrast a written story, drama, or poem to its audio, filmed, staged, or multimedia version, analyzing the effects of techniques unique to each medium (e.g., lighting, sound, color, or camera focus and angles in a film).

 RL 7.9 Compare and contrast a fictional portrayal of a time, place, or character and a historical account of the same period as a means of understanding how authors of fiction use or alter history.

RI 7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

W 7.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

 

 

 

Learning Target(s)/Objective: (What will students know & be able to do as a result of this lesson?)

I can compare and contrast the written version of Holes to the Holes movie.

I can compare the novel Holes to the historical content of Jim Crow laws.

I can compare and contrast the Holes text to the video version to determine the difference in delivery of words.

I can write a narrative similar with elements similar to the Holes novel.

 

 

 

 

 

Bell Ringer:

Write an essay to explain why honesty is important in a friendship. 

Guided Practice:

TTW guide the students through the direction to complete the worksheet while watching the movie.

 

 

Content-Specific Vocabulary:

  1. writhe

    to move in a twisting or contorted motion

    His body writhed in agony.

  2. desolate

    providing no shelter or sustenance

    Walking across the desolate wasteland, Stanley thought about his great-grandfather—not the pig stealer but the pig stealer's son, the one who was robbed by Kissin' Kate Barlow.

    Compare with the vocabulary word in another list: "barren."

  3. flap

    any broad, thin, and limber covering attached at one edge

    "Thanks," he said as Zero entered through the tent flap.

Independent Practice:

 

TSW complete the film and finish the worksheet.

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

cent/i -hundred, hundredth

 centr/o -center

Formative Assessment:

TSW turn in the worksheet for grade.

 

 

 

Resources/Materials: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

Promethean

Pencils

Pens

Paper

Worksheet

 

 

 <