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Kathleen Abbott » April Lesson Plans

April Lesson Plans

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 23 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






-RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

-RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

 

I CAN analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations or key information.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Trace means to outline, delineate, or describe.
  • A student should know the difference between a claim that is supported with reasons and evidence opposed to a claim this is unsupported.
  • A student should know how to identify a speaker’s claim(s) and explain how each claim is supported by the argument or arguments the speaker makes (the evidence).
  • A student should understand that a speaker uses reasons, facts, statistics, details, etc. to support his or her arguments for a claim or claims.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Read/Analyze Bellringer article “A Holocaust Survivor, Spared from Gas Chamber by A Twist of Fate”
  • Read Chapter 11/12 of Divergent
  • Complete Chapter 11/12 Vocabulary/questions

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What can be learned from conflict?

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 24 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






-RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

-RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

 

I CAN analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations or key information.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A claim is a statement of opinion the writer or speaker is trying to prove.
  • Argument(s) is how the speaker supports his claim(s); argument is the main point or points a speaker makes to provide supporting reasons and evidence for his claim.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Complete questions 1-4 on Bellringer, question 1 discussion questions
  • Review vocabulary words and comprehension questions for Chapter 11/12

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does a person overcome adversity? Cite evidence from the text, your own experience, and other art, literature, or history.

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 25 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






-RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

-RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

 

I CAN analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations or key information.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • How to understand that authors present information differently.
  • How to integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgably.
  • How to compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Bellringer discussion questions 2 and 3
  • Begin reading “Elie Wiesel’s Comments at the Dedication of the Yad Vashem Holocaust History Museum”. Close read for unfamiliar words and phrases as well as how Elie Wiesel believes the museum can impact the future. (Arguments)

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What is the goal of education, especially when it comes to history and human rights? Cite evidence from the text and your own experiences.

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 26 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






-RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

-RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

 

I CAN analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations or key information.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • How to understand that authors present information differently.
  • How to integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgably.
  • How to compare and contrast the most important points and key details presented in two texts on the same topic.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will complete discussion questions for “Elie Wiesel’s Comments at the Dedication of the Yad Vashem Holocaust History Museum”.
  • Students will begin cold write with the following prompt: Compare and contrast the experiences of Elie Wiesel and Jack Mandelbaum, citing at least 3 similarities and differences. Cite evidence from both texts.

 

  • Closure




Homework

None

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





In your opinion, what lessons has the world failed to learn from the holocaust?

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 27 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






-RI.7.8 Trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient to support the claims.

-RI.7.9 Analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations of key information by emphasizing different evidence or advancing different interpretations of facts

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN trace and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text.

 

I CAN analyze how two or more authors writing about the same topic shape their presentations or key information.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Complete cold write for a grade
  • Complete quiz on “Elie Wiesel’s Comments at the Dedication of the Yad Vashem Holocaust History Museum” for a grade.

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





In the context of the text, what can we learn from tragedy?

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 16, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. RI.7.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

I CAN compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A student should be able to provide an analysis of how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text
  • A student should be able to provide an analysis of how a particular sentence, chapter, or section contributes to the development of the ideas
  • A student knows how to compare and contrast the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • A student knows how to describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Read and analyze “Nazi Germany’s ‘Euthanasia’ Program”
  • Teacher will give final recommendations regarding state tests and students will ask any questions they have about the test.

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which of the following best expresses the central idea of the article?

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 17, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. RI.7.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

I CAN compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A student knows how to use text features and search tools (e.g., headings, tables of contents, captions, bold print, subheadings, glossaries, indexes, electronic menus, icons, key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently.
  • Common organizational structures are found in informational texts (cause/effect, comparison/contrast, problem/solution, sequential, chronological).
  • Informational texts (i.e. textbooks, domain-specific articles) are divided into different parts.
  • Titles, introductions, headings, and sections.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will answer questions 1-4 on pg. 3 of bellringer.
  • Teacher will give final recommendations for the writing portion of the state test. Students will ask any questions they have.

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the rhetoric of the article help develop the purpose of the article?

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 18, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. RI.7.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

I CAN compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Students know that authors develop point of view through author’s style, tone, word choice, description, omission of information, inclusion of information, etc.
    Students know that authors can direct readers’ attention to the exact detail, opinion, idea, emotion, etc., the author wants to stress through his or her style of writing.
  • Students know the ways in which an author’s point of view influences content and style.
  • An author’s writing is influenced by his experiences, background, and values.
  • Students know that authors use different points of view to offer different perceptions and to develop a text based on the author’s purpose for writing.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Bellringer – question 5 pg. 4
  • Read Ch. 9 and 10 of Divergent; review vocabulary

 

  • Closure




Homework

None

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





In the context of the text, what are the effects of this prejudice?

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 19, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. RI.7.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

I CAN compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Author’s purpose is the reason the author is writing the text.
  • A student should know how to determine an author’s purpose when it is not explicitly stated in the text.
  • A student should be able to analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • A student should be able to compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic and describe the differences in focus and the information provided.
  • A student should be able to distinguish his or her own point of view from that of the author of a text.
  • A student should be able to identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Bellringer questions 1 and 2 on pg. 5
  • Complete vocabulary sheets for chapter 9 and 10
  • Review vocab for test

 

  • Closure




Homework

Question 3 pg. 5

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





 

 

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 20, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.5 Analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text, including how the major sections contribute to the whole and to the development of the ideas. RI.7.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

RI.7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the structure an author uses to organize a text.

I CAN determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author distinguishes his or her position from that of others.

I CAN compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A student can interpret information and data presented visually, quantitatively, and in writing.
  • A student can apply information from multiple sources to understand a topic.
  • A student can integrate information on a topic from several texts to develop a base of knowledge on a subject (e.g., categorize/organize information, compare information, summarize from multiple texts)
  • A student should be able to draw on information from multiple print and digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Vocabulary Test for Chapter 5
  • Cold Write on Question 4 Pg. 5 on  bellringer packet

 

  • Closure




Homework

None

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





The euthanasia program was met with outrage and was temporarily shut down, yet it was reinstituted and went on to serve as a model for the Final Solution. Why do you think leaders would engage in a program they knew the public disapproved of? Cite evidence from the text, your personal experience, and other literature, art, and history in your answer.

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 9, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.  

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • NWEA MAP TESTING




Homework

None

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





What does the word “ominous” most likely mean as used in paragraph 3?

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 10, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.  

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







  • NWEA MAP TESTING


Homework

None

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Consider the structure of the last two paragraphs in the text. What implicit, or unspoken conclusion does the article make?

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 11, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.  

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A student is able to provide a detailed analysis of how a key individual or idea is introduced in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is illustrated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • Illustrate means to explain, describe, or give example of an individual, event, or idea.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Students will close read and annotate “The Daisy Girl Ad” from Commonlit. Students will identify words they don’t know, make notes on important parts of the passage, and take notes on how the ad impacted the American audience.
  • Teacher will instruct students on test taking skills to prepare for state tests.

 

  • Closure




Homework

Bellringer packet questions 1-4 multiple choice

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How might the Daisy Girl commercial be considered a negative campaign ad against Goldwater without ever mentioning his name?

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 12, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.  

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • An example is something that is mentioned in a text to help explain, illustrate or clarify a concept for readers.
  • An anecdote is a short narrative that is often presented in an informational text to assist readers in comprehending the text.
  • A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas based on specific information in the text.
  • A student is able to explain the relationships or interactions between two or more concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text.
  • A student is able to explain procedures in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Daisy Girl Ad Bellringer question 5 and discussion question 1
  • Students will receive Cold Write 2 back with a writing checklist to revise their essays to better prepare for state tests
  • Teacher will spend time discussing test taking skills and strategies

 

  • Closure




Homework

Discussion question 2 and 3

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Was this a fair commercial to run during the campaign? Why or why not?

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 12, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.3 Analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.  

RI.7.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN analyze the interactions between individuals, events, and ideas in a text.

I CAN determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Students use context clues to determine what a word means in a given context (e.g., figurative, connotative).
  • Determine the connotative meaning of particular words and phrases based on context
  • Figurative language uses words in some way other than their literal meanings to make a comparison, add emphasis, or say something in a fresh and creative way.
  • An exaggeration describes something as being greater, larger, more important, etc., than it really is - an extravagant statement that is not meant to be taken literally.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Bellringer questions 4 and 5 – students will turn in completed bellringer for a grade
  • Students will turn in completed writing assignment
  • Last minute test review and test taking strategies

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Why do you think the ad was pulled off television? Explain your answer.

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 3, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

I CAN determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Students focus closely and critically on content in an informational text.
  • Students form a thorough understanding or analysis of what they are reading and for selecting key evidence for use in writing or speaking.
  • Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when explaining what a text is about.
  • Students refer directly to details and examples in a text and/or quote accurately from a text when drawing inferences from a text.
  • Students understand what it means to draw inferences from a text.

 

  • Bellringer – Students will read Commonlit passage called “Total Control in North Korea”. Students will read, analyze, and annotate passage for bellringer.
  • Students will read Chapter 5 and 6 in Divergent. After reading, students will answer vocabulary and comprehension questions in groups.

 

  • Closure – What is one way that North Korea has control over its citizens?




Homework

Pg. 5 questions 1-3

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which of the following is a central idea from the article? Which phrase from the text best supports the answer for part A?

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 4, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

I CAN determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Students ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text.
  • Students utilize an appropriate standard format for giving credit to the authors they are citing, such as the MLA or the APA.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Bellringer – pg. 6 questions 4-6
  • Review homework
  • Students will review for state tests. Students will click in answers for Practice Test and will begin reviewing questions in groups.

 

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the first paragraph contribute to the central idea of the article?

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 5, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

I CAN determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • Being able to determine a central idea of a text reflects comprehension of a text.
  • A summary should contain only information from the text.
  • Personal opinions about a topic or idea should not be included in a summary.
  • Personal judgments about a topic or idea should not be included in a summary.
  • A student is able to summarize a text.
  • A student can identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text. A student can identify the focus of specific paragraphs within a text.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Bellringer – Students will complete pg. 7 questions 1 and 2.
  • Students will get back the previous two writing assignments. They will be given a guide to modify their previous response to help build on previous writing skills. Students will do things such as make sure they have a proper introduction and closing and add transitional words and phrases. Responses will be typed into Google Classroom on Friday for a grade.
  • Students will read Chapter 7 of Divergent if time permits.

 

  • Closure




Homework

Pg. 7 question 3

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





Which statement best describes why North Korea punishes political deviants? Which phrase from the text best supports the answer to Part A?

 

 

 

 

Teacher: Abbott Date: April 6, 2018 Subject: ELA Topic: Reading for Information

 

Standard(s)






RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

RI.7.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an accurate summary of the text based upon this analysis.

Learning Target(s)

(based on the language of the standard)








I CAN cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

 

I CAN determine a central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text.

Procedures (with general times)







 

  • Prior knowledge
  • A student is able to provide a detailed analysis of how a key individual or idea is introduced in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is illustrated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • A student is able to provide detailed analysis of how a key individual, event or idea is elaborated in a text (e.g., through examples and anecdotes)
  • Illustrate means to explain, describe, or give example of an individual, event, or idea.

 

  • Activities/Centers
  • Homework answers will be checked and reviewed.
  • Students will complete bellringer quiz and vocabulary quiz.
  • Students will type edited writing responses into Google Classroom for a grade.

 

  • Closure




Homework

none

Example of an Assessment Item Related to the Standard





How does the author use multiple viewpoints to support her argument in the article? Cite evidence from the article for your answer.